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Course Schedules

On-site Courses

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Please note that the following are tentative course schedules for enrollment purposes only.

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Organic Agriculture
MON to THU 9:00 AM-12:40 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: Lecture with experiential component on field. Lab fee and/or material costs apply.
LdM Course code: AGR 220 T
Marist Code/Title: AGR 230L Organic Agriculture
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Agriculture
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Hours: 60
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Beatrice
Description: Organic foods have become a familiar site on both restaurant menus and supermarket shelves. But what does organic agriculture actually imply? Well, many things: respect for a farm’s unique environment and the absence of pesticides; coordination of farming elements and the rejuvenation of fields compromised by intensive agriculture; and new techniques that permit productivity, quality, and profitability, while respecting stringent legislative regulations. We explore organic agriculture from the perspective of business management, agronomy, as well as history, culture and ethics. Students also experience the process firsthand through participation in seasonal activities at local farms and facilities, including horticultural work in the spring and olive harvesting and pressing in fall. Course meets for 45 hours in fall, 60 hours in summer, and 90 hours in spring.
Organic Agriculture
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: Lecture with experiential component on field. Lab fee and/or material costs apply.
LdM Course code: AGR 220 T
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Tuscania
Session: FALL
School: Agriculture
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tymicha
Description: Organic foods have become a familiar site on both restaurant menus and supermarket shelves. But what does organic agriculture actually imply? Well, many things: respect for a farm’s unique environment and the absence of pesticides; coordination of farming elements and the rejuvenation of fields compromised by intensive agriculture; and new techniques that permit productivity, quality, and profitability, while respecting stringent legislative regulations. We explore organic agriculture from the perspective of business management, agronomy, as well as history, culture and ethics. Students also experience the process firsthand through participation in seasonal activities at local farms and facilities, including horticultural work in the spring and olive harvesting and pressing in fall. Course meets for 45 hours in fall, 60 hours in summer, and 90 hours in spring.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
LdM Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
LdM Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
LdM Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 200 T
Dual Listing: HIS 200 T
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tina
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 200 T
Dual Listing: HIS 200 T
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Tuscania
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tina
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 216 T
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tina
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Ancient Egypt
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 255 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 255 L Ancient Egypt
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: Why and how were the pyramids built? How do you read hieroglyphics? What did ancient Egyptians believe occurred after death? We explore the major sites, objects, and texts from this civilization in the Nile Valley to gain insight into their culture, politics, art, religion, and literature. In addition to covering 4000 years of Egyptian civilization, from its origins in the late 4th millennium BCE until the late Roman Empire, we also discuss the field of modern Egyptology, in which Italy has played an important role. Students examine both primary and secondary sources, as well as archaeological data. Includes a visit to Florence’s own Egyptian Museum.
Ancient Egypt
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 255 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 255 L Ancient Egypt
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: Why and how were the pyramids built? How do you read hieroglyphics? What did ancient Egyptians believe occurred after death? We explore the major sites, objects, and texts from this civilization in the Nile Valley to gain insight into their culture, politics, art, religion, and literature. In addition to covering 4000 years of Egyptian civilization, from its origins in the late 4th millennium BCE until the late Roman Empire, we also discuss the field of modern Egyptology, in which Italy has played an important role. Students examine both primary and secondary sources, as well as archaeological data. Includes a visit to Florence’s own Egyptian Museum.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; lecture with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via dell’Ariento 10/14
Room: CUCINA Lab
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 10:00 AM-12:30 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Buontalenti
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 302
OPEN
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Buontalenti
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES. Theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-3:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: Special 6-cr course. Runs MON-FRI, some days require full day activity. Current tetanus vaccination + internat. health insurance valid abroad required. In collab. with CAMNES. Please request separate brochure for details.
LdM Course code: ANC 282-283 T
Dual Listing: ANT 282-283 T HIS 282-283 T
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 Archeology Field I and II
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 6
Hours: 148
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: -TBA-
Description: An intensive, four-week journey into the world of archaeology, with a unique combination of supervised fieldwork and academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. We explore Etruscan civilization in its material culture, artistic production, and socio-political organization, while contributing to the ongoing excavation and preservation of an active site and learning fundamental archaeological techniques. Offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES), the course is held in Tuscania, one of the richest Etruscan archaeological areas. Includes weekly visits to other relevant sites, monuments and museums, in both the Tuscia region and Rome.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REL 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REL 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REL 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
The Art of Persuasion, from Antiquity to Modern Times
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 289 F
Dual Listing: COM 289 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 302L Persuasion
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Since ancient times, the art of persuasive speaking has empowered people and offered tools to succeed in social, political and judicial contexts. The course will look into the techniques that have made language powerful through the ages, in both Greco-Roman antiquity and modern political discourse. Both linguistic and non-linguistic strategies will be analyzed: creation of arguments, choice of vocabulary, use of proof and demonstrative strategies, performance, construction of the political self, weakening of the opponent. Comparisons between ancient and modern rhetorical strategies will be constantly drawn. During the interactive sessions, the students will also actively apply the techniques which have been studied during the course. Notably, they will learn to build and deliver effective persuasive speeches and to confront their fellow classmates in debates on mostly fictitious model cases.
The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in Classics, Literature, or Religion.
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 306 F
Dual Listing: LIT 306 F
Marist Code/Title: LIT 306 / ENG 270 L The Age of Heroes: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid and the Origins of Western Literature/ Classics of Western Lit
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: A comparative analysis of some of the oldest, greatest literary works in Western civilization. Using the most significant chapters from the Iliad and the Odyssey, written in the 8th century BCE, we immerse ourselves in the epic, supernatural world of Homer’s heroes, the veritable “bible” of classical civilization. How did the Greeks use myths to express the archetypal values that would become the cornerstones of future generations and civilizations? How did myths function as examples of storytelling prowess, expressions of ancient cultural traditions, and basic forms of communication and instruction? Then we observe the influence of this Greek tradition on the Romans in a selection of passages from the Aeneid, Virgil’s foundational epic from the 1st century BCE.
The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in Classics, Literature, or Religion.
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 306 F
Dual Listing: LIT 306 F
Marist Code/Title: LIT 306 / ENG 270 L The Age of Heroes: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid and the Origins of Western Literature/ Classics of Western Lit
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: A comparative analysis of some of the oldest, greatest literary works in Western civilization. Using the most significant chapters from the Iliad and the Odyssey, written in the 8th century BCE, we immerse ourselves in the epic, supernatural world of Homer’s heroes, the veritable “bible” of classical civilization. How did the Greeks use myths to express the archetypal values that would become the cornerstones of future generations and civilizations? How did myths function as examples of storytelling prowess, expressions of ancient cultural traditions, and basic forms of communication and instruction? Then we observe the influence of this Greek tradition on the Romans in a selection of passages from the Aeneid, Virgil’s foundational epic from the 1st century BCE.
Mystery Cults of the Ancient Mediterranean
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in ancient Greco-Roman religion, mythology or history, or equivalent
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 321 F
Dual Listing: REL 321 F
Marist Code/Title: Marist Equivalent Pending
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Explores the most important features of Greek and Roman religion and mythology, with a particular focus on the mystery cults dedicated to Isis, Mithra, Demeter and Kore, and a series of other deities. Their elaborate initiation rituals and their social importance in ancient Greece and Rome as revealed in literary and archaeological sources. Then we place these cults in their long-term historical context, following their later evolution from the Renaissance to the present.
Mystery Cults of the Ancient Mediterranean
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in ancient Greco-Roman religion, mythology or history, or equivalent
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANC 321 F
Dual Listing: REL 321 F
Marist Code/Title: REST 216L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: Explores the most important features of Greek and Roman religion and mythology, with a particular focus on the mystery cults dedicated to Isis, Mithra, Demeter and Kore, and a series of other deities. Their elaborate initiation rituals and their social importance in ancient Greece and Rome as revealed in literary and archaeological sources. Then we place these cults in their long-term historical context, following their later evolution from the Renaissance to the present.
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
LdM Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
LdM Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
LdM Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Italian Identity Across Food and Culture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: lecture only, no hands-on cooking component
LdM Course code: ANT 198 F
Dual Listing: IGC 198 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: You may be what you eat, but why do you eat the way you do? Why do people make different food choices in their daily lives? What makes certain social classes avoid or value certain types of foods? Food is an important factor in how we define ourselves: people’s attitude toward it can reveal not just personal characteristics, but a broader food ideology. We explore the relationships between food’s multiple meanings and the physical acts of cooking and eating, and how food influences personal and group identity. The role of food in constructing ethnic identity, displaying religious beliefs and negotiating gender roles, and food’s ability to transmit and preserve cultures and values.
Italian Identity Across Food and Culture
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: theoretical course only
LdM Course code: ANT 198 F
Dual Listing: IGC 198 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: You may be what you eat, but why do you eat the way you do? Why do people make different food choices in their daily lives? What makes certain social classes avoid or value certain types of foods? Food is an important factor in how we define ourselves: people’s attitude toward it can reveal not just personal characteristics, but a broader food ideology. We explore the relationships between food’s multiple meanings and the physical acts of cooking and eating, and how food influences personal and group identity. The role of food in constructing ethnic identity, displaying religious beliefs and negotiating gender roles, and food’s ability to transmit and preserve cultures and values.
Arts and Society Through an Anthropological Lens
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: ANT 205 F
Dual Listing: ART 205 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 102 L Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: What do artists and anthropologists have in common? What does it mean to use art as a research tool in anthropology? Can contemporary artists be inspired by social sciences in their creative endeavors? Throughout the twentieth century and in the first decades of the new millennium anthropologists have become more and more interested in using art as a research method and as a creative way of sharing their work with the rest of the world. At the same time, contemporary artists have introduced ethnographic methods in their artistic practice to have a major impact on social issues, as demonstrated in global movements such as ‘Arts and Society.’ This course explores the relationship between anthropology and the arts, in particular, literature, music, dance, theatre, cinema, and photography in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine both fields as creative ways of looking at the world, focusing in particular on how the arts have been included as a method in anthropological research, how anthropology has been used as a reference for contemporary art, and how this affects our view of the world.
Arts and Society Through an Anthropological Lens
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ANT 205 F
Dual Listing: ART 205 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 102 L Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: What do artists and anthropologists have in common? What does it mean to use art as a research tool in anthropology? Can contemporary artists be inspired by social sciences in their creative endeavors? Throughout the twentieth century and in the first decades of the new millennium anthropologists have become more and more interested in using art as a research method and as a creative way of sharing their work with the rest of the world. At the same time, contemporary artists have introduced ethnographic methods in their artistic practice to have a major impact on social issues, as demonstrated in global movements such as ‘Arts and Society.’ This course explores the relationship between anthropology and the arts, in particular, literature, music, dance, theatre, cinema, and photography in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine both fields as creative ways of looking at the world, focusing in particular on how the arts have been included as a method in anthropological research, how anthropology has been used as a reference for contemporary art, and how this affects our view of the world.
Food and Religion: Rituals, Traditions and Taboos
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANT 251 F
Dual Listing: REL 251 F
Marist Code/Title: REST 232 L Relion and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: Food is crucial to understanding sacred traditions, whether past or present. Why do people feast and fast for religious reasons? How pervasive are “food taboos”? Why have Muslims and Jews banned pork from their diet? Why do Christians eat fish on Fridays, while Hindus and Buddhists are largely vegetarian? Religions not only attribute values to nourishment, but use it to create symbolic codes of personal and group identity, mediate with the divine, and promote spiritual growth. With a thematic, comparative, and interdisciplinary approach, we use food to explore religious beliefs and practices from various cultures and time periods. Sources include case studies, guest lectures, anthropological studies, and ethical and sacred texts. During their stay, students have the chance to witness some of these food-centered religious practices and taboos firsthand.
Food and Religion: Rituals, Traditions and Taboos
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: ANT 251 F
Dual Listing: REL 251 F
Marist Code/Title: REST 232 L Religion and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: Food is crucial to understanding sacred traditions, whether past or present. Why do people feast and fast for religious reasons? How pervasive are “food taboos”? Why have Muslims and Jews banned pork from their diet? Why do Christians eat fish on Fridays, while Hindus and Buddhists are largely vegetarian? Religions not only attribute values to nourishment, but use it to create symbolic codes of personal and group identity, mediate with the divine, and promote spiritual growth. With a thematic, comparative, and interdisciplinary approach, we use food to explore religious beliefs and practices from various cultures and time periods. Sources include case studies, guest lectures, anthropological studies, and ethical and sacred texts. During their stay, students have the chance to witness some of these food-centered religious practices and taboos firsthand.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; lecture with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via dell’Ariento 10/14
Room: CUCINA Lab
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 10:00 AM-12:30 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Buontalenti
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 302
OPEN
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES; theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Buontalenti
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES. Theoretical course with practical cooking component. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.). Lab fee required.
LdM Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-3:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: Special 6-cr course. Runs MON-FRI, some days require full day activity. Current tetanus vaccination + internat. health insurance valid abroad required. In collab. with CAMNES. Please request separate brochure for details.
LdM Course code: ANT 282-283 T
Dual Listing: ANC 282-283 T HIS 282-283 T
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 Archeology Field I and II
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 6
Hours: 90
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: -TBA-
Description: An intensive, four-week journey into the world of archaeology, with a unique combination of supervised fieldwork and academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. We explore Etruscan civilization in its material culture, artistic production, and socio-political organization, while contributing to the ongoing excavation and preservation of an active site and learning fundamental archaeological techniques. Offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES), the course is held in Tuscania, one of the richest Etruscan archaeological areas. Includes weekly visits to other relevant sites, monuments and museums, in both the Tuscia region and Rome.
History of Architecture I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance Architecture
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: includes fieltrip to Rome
LdM Course code: ART 166 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 110 L History of Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: What is the common thread that holds together the evolution of Western architecture from the Greek temple to the present? How has architecture evolved since the definition of classical canons to their reemergence in the Florentine Quattrocento? With firsthand onsite visits, we analyze the main historical periods and architectural movements from classical Greece and Rome to Paleochristian, Romanesque and Gothic architecture, up to the early Renaissance. We shed a light on architecture and city planning in their social, economic and cultural context, and examine their relation with the evolution of construction materials and techniques over the centuries. In the history of architecture everything is connected: the various epochs and styles are compared to the main architectures of the twentieth century, in order to find analogies, differences, and returns.
History of Architecture I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance Architecture
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 166 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 110 L History of Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: What is the common thread that holds together the evolution of Western architecture from the Greek temple to the present? How has architecture evolved since the definition of classical canons to their reemergence in the Florentine Quattrocento? With firsthand onsite visits, we analyze the main historical periods and architectural movements from classical Greece and Rome to Paleochristian, Romanesque and Gothic architecture, up to the early Renaissance. We shed a light on architecture and city planning in their social, economic and cultural context, and examine their relation with the evolution of construction materials and techniques over the centuries. In the history of architecture everything is connected: the various epochs and styles are compared to the main architectures of the twentieth century, in order to find analogies, differences, and returns.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Eco
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180L History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
History of Architecture II: High Renaissance Architecture to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 187 F
Marist Code/Title: Marist Equivalent Pending
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Eco
Description: How did the Renaissance revolution change the way of thinking about architecture and the city? From the rediscovery of classical beauty, a brand new thought was born in the Western world: Raphael, Michelangelo, Leonardo are the masters of this new conception of architecture that from Florence spread across Italy and Europe, constructing the cities and masterpieces we know. The course begins from the High Renaissance and then explores Mannerism, the Baroque, neo-Gothic and industrial architecture, up to the great revolution of the International Style. We delve into the main protagonists of these centuries, examining their thoughts and projects in relation to the historical and social context, technological and construction innovations, with a particular focus on the relationship between space and natural light. Special attention is given to the International Style and its protagonists, investigating elements of innovation and continuity with the past.
Beauty will Save the World: Introduction to Aesthetics
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 200 F
Dual Listing: PHI 200 F
Marist Code/Title: IART 200L Beauty Will Save the World: Introduction to Aesthetics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Aesthetics literally means "the science of sense perception", it is the study of the sensory messages, the mediums through which they are conveyed, and the artistic expressions that “massage” the senses. As the highest expression of human experience, art serves as a response to the unimaginable atrocities perpetrated by humanity, reminding us of the importance of maintaining faith in the human spirit. But what is art? Is there any inter-subjective standard of taste, or is it solely based on subjective feelings? Is art becoming obsolete in the age of AI and cybernetic reproduction, or is it undergoing a new transformation?" All of these questions revolve around the fundamental issue: what is human creativity? Through lectures, readings, debates, hands-on exercises and visits to renowned artistic institutions in Florence, we investigate how art and philosophy inform one another and shape our understanding of the world.
Beauty will Save the World: Introduction to Aesthetics
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 200 F
Dual Listing: PHI 200 F
Marist Code/Title: IART 200L Beauty Will Save the World: Introduction to Aesthetics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Aesthetics literally means "the science of sense perception", it is the study of the sensory messages, the mediums through which they are conveyed, and the artistic expressions that “massage” the senses. As the highest expression of human experience, art serves as a response to the unimaginable atrocities perpetrated by humanity, reminding us of the importance of maintaining faith in the human spirit. But what is art? Is there any inter-subjective standard of taste, or is it solely based on subjective feelings? Is art becoming obsolete in the age of AI and cybernetic reproduction, or is it undergoing a new transformation?" All of these questions revolve around the fundamental issue: what is human creativity? Through lectures, readings, debates, hands-on exercises and visits to renowned artistic institutions in Florence, we investigate how art and philosophy inform one another and shape our understanding of the world.
The Built Environment of Florence
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
The Built Environment of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
20th Century Design and Architecture
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 202 F
Dual Listing: ARC 202 F
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An introduction to the tools and methods for understanding and recognizing choices and style in architectural design, in both interior and exterior settings. We explore the work of the 19th and early 20th-century masters (up to c. 1960) who expressed their talents and aesthetic vision from the small scale of objects and interiors to the grand ideas of entire buildings, neighborhoods and cities. Given the close relationship between interior design, object design and architecture, we examine the history of these three fields beginning with the Industrial Revolution. How did politics, economics and scientific and technological discoveries impact society, art, and architecture? What drove innovation in materials and aesthetics in the past, and how has this process changed in today’s world?
20th Century Design and Architecture
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 202 F
Dual Listing: ARC 202 F
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An introduction to the tools and methods for understanding and recognizing choices and style in architectural design, in both interior and exterior settings. We explore the work of the 19th and early 20th-century masters (up to c. 1960) who expressed their talents and aesthetic vision from the small scale of objects and interiors to the grand ideas of entire buildings, neighborhoods and cities. Given the close relationship between interior design, object design and architecture, we examine the history of these three fields beginning with the Industrial Revolution. How did politics, economics and scientific and technological discoveries impact society, art, and architecture? What drove innovation in materials and aesthetics in the past, and how has this process changed in today’s world?
Arts and Society Through an Anthropological Lens
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 205 F
Dual Listing: ANT 205 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 102 L Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: What do artists and anthropologists have in common? What does it mean to use art as a research tool in anthropology? Can contemporary artists be inspired by social sciences in their creative endeavors? Throughout the twentieth century and in the first decades of the new millennium anthropologists have become more and more interested in using art as a research method and as a creative way of sharing their work with the rest of the world. At the same time, contemporary artists have introduced ethnographic methods in their artistic practice to have a major impact on social issues, as demonstrated in global movements such as ‘Arts and Society.’ This course explores the relationship between anthropology and the arts, in particular, literature, music, dance, theatre, cinema, and photography in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine both fields as creative ways of looking at the world, focusing in particular on how the arts have been included as a method in anthropological research, how anthropology has been used as a reference for contemporary art, and how this affects our view of the world.
Arts and Society Through an Anthropological Lens
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 205 F
Dual Listing: ANT 205 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 102 L Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: What do artists and anthropologists have in common? What does it mean to use art as a research tool in anthropology? Can contemporary artists be inspired by social sciences in their creative endeavors? Throughout the twentieth century and in the first decades of the new millennium anthropologists have become more and more interested in using art as a research method and as a creative way of sharing their work with the rest of the world. At the same time, contemporary artists have introduced ethnographic methods in their artistic practice to have a major impact on social issues, as demonstrated in global movements such as ‘Arts and Society.’ This course explores the relationship between anthropology and the arts, in particular, literature, music, dance, theatre, cinema, and photography in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine both fields as creative ways of looking at the world, focusing in particular on how the arts have been included as a method in anthropological research, how anthropology has been used as a reference for contemporary art, and how this affects our view of the world.
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
The World of Museums: Museology
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
Palaces of Florence
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 204
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 205
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 206
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 207
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 208
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 209
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Hack
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 302
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 103
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 104
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
The Genius of Michelangelo
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 270 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 205 L Michelangelo
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: The life and work of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), one of history’s most gifted and revolutionary artists. We examine his long artistic career as a sculptor, painter, architect, and poet. A key focus will be the artist’s personal and artistic relationship with his peers, particularly his illustrious contemporaries, the great masters Leonardo and Raphael. We also explore his many important patrons, including the Medici in Florence and the papal court in Rome. Students gain a detailed knowledge of Michelangelo’s oeuvre while strengthening their skills in analyzing major works of art. Important sources include recent literature in the field, documents from Michelangelo’s own time, and the artist’s own writings. Museum visits provide an opportunity to compare Michelangelo’s masterpieces to the works of his contemporaries.
Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 277 F
Dual Listing: COM 277 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 294 L ART: Special Topics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Eco
Description: What do Vespa scooters, Vittorio De Sica's neorealist movies, Gucci’s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti’s “Superleggera” chair, Giuseppe Cavalli’s photos of southern Italian trulli, and Alberto Burri’s canvases spattered with tar have in common? Is there such thing as a shared “Italian” visual culture? We explore this question with a communications-based approach to visual culture in post-World War II Italy. Our subjects are works of contemporary art and design, conceived as communicators of cultural messages that blur the often-artificial distinction between these two fields. Case studies highlight how designers, directors, and artists influenced one another and even collaborated directly, instances in which theory took a back seat to process and context. Students will find inspiration in these concrete paths to innovation.
Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 277 F
Dual Listing: COM 277 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 294 L ART: Special Topics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: What do Vespa scooters, Vittorio De Sica's neorealist movies, Gucci’s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti’s “Superleggera” chair, Giuseppe Cavalli’s photos of southern Italian trulli, and Alberto Burri’s canvases spattered with tar have in common? Is there such thing as a shared “Italian” visual culture? We explore this question with a communications-based approach to visual culture in post-World War II Italy. Our subjects are works of contemporary art and design, conceived as communicators of cultural messages that blur the often-artificial distinction between these two fields. Case studies highlight how designers, directors, and artists influenced one another and even collaborated directly, instances in which theory took a back seat to process and context. Students will find inspiration in these concrete paths to innovation.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The social, economic, political, and religious life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi and others. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance, we examine their art (architecture, painting and sculpture) and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can visual and material culture tell us about life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of art and patronage, we shed light on the public and private lives of the elite families and other social groups in Renaissance Florence, in order to discover the unique features that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in many ways still do.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: The social, economic, political, and religious life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi and others. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance, we examine their art (architecture, painting and sculpture) and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can visual and material culture tell us about life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of art and patronage, we shed light on the public and private lives of the elite families and other social groups in Renaissance Florence, in order to discover the unique features that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in many ways still do.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
FULL
LdM Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: The social, economic, political, and religious life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi and others. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance, we examine their art (architecture, painting and sculpture) and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can visual and material culture tell us about life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of art and patronage, we shed light on the public and private lives of the elite families and other social groups in Renaissance Florence, in order to discover the unique features that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in many ways still do.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: The social, economic, political, and religious life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi and others. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance, we examine their art (architecture, painting and sculpture) and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can visual and material culture tell us about life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of art and patronage, we shed light on the public and private lives of the elite families and other social groups in Renaissance Florence, in order to discover the unique features that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in many ways still do.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: The social, economic, political, and religious life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi and others. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance, we examine their art (architecture, painting and sculpture) and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can visual and material culture tell us about life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of art and patronage, we shed light on the public and private lives of the elite families and other social groups in Renaissance Florence, in order to discover the unique features that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in many ways still do.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 281 F
Dual Listing: GND 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 281 F
Dual Listing: GND 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 166 History of Architecture I, or equivalent
Notes: includes fieltrip to Rome
LdM Course code: ART 286 F
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Major developments in architecture, interior design, and city planning from 1960 to the present, with a particular focus on the last two decades. How has contemporary architecture reflected changes in broader society and culture? We discuss the most important debates concerning aesthetics and theory, including the controversies surrounding the supposed “decline” of modernism. Students also familiarize themselves with key architects and studios, and how they have distinguished themselves and innovated with respect to their predecessors. While our perspective is global, our emphasis remains European, and on Italy in particular.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 166 History of Architecture I, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 286 F
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Major developments in architecture, interior design, and city planning from 1960 to the present, with a particular focus on the last two decades. How has contemporary architecture reflected changes in broader society and culture? We discuss the most important debates concerning aesthetics and theory, including the controversies surrounding the supposed “decline” of modernism. Students also familiarize themselves with key architects and studios, and how they have distinguished themselves and innovated with respect to their predecessors. While our perspective is global, our emphasis remains European, and on Italy in particular.
International Art Business
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
LdM Course code: ART 297 F
Dual Listing: BUS 290 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An introduction to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote art-based transactions. We explore the buying and selling of works of art, both within the auction framework and elsewhere. Lectures and interactions with sector specialists help students develop their ability to identify and analyze pieces of art, access marketing opportunities, and devise effective strategies for a variety of professional roles. We specifically investigate the role of the art dealer and art administrator, as well as gain a firm understanding of the international laws and other recognized practices that regulate the field.
Images and Words
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Junior standing; 2) ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 355 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 477 L : Capping: Images and Words
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: What is art? Where do we see it and why do we look at it? How do we talk about, describe, or explain a work of art? Is it possible to “read” images the same way we can “see” stories, and if so, how? Our interdisciplinary approach aims to help students develop their ability to read, discuss, and write about both visual and written texts. This exploration of the relationship between us (spectators and/or creators), images and words opens up new ways of seeing and perceiving works of art. An introduction to the most relevant theoretical ideas is followed by a close examination of visual and written works, including prose and poetry. An active engagement with the entire universe of artistic experience through the teachings and methods of art theory and art history, literature, museology, and sociology.
Museum/Gallery Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Italian fluency is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students who lack Italian language skills. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline), onsite interview and Italian language placement test. Final placement may be determined upon Italian language ability. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
LdM Course code: ART 360 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 N Museum Experience "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A hands-on, professional experience in cultural mediation and museum education. Interns observe how collections are managed at their host institution, conduct individual research, participate in giving guided tours and in organizing events and activities. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect weekly reports, one paper and a special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Museum and gallery internships require some Saturday hours. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs on-site, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments). Places are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Application requirements: CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test. Prereq: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Italian fluency is recommended, but not required
Museum/Gallery Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Prereqs: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Italian fluency recommended but not required.
Notes: Requires min. 135 internship hrs and full-time status (min. 15 cr). Placement limited, especially if without Italian language skills. Application requirements: CV, 2 letters of reference, formal letter of intent, due by application deadline. Acceptance subject to onsite interview during first week of term + Italian language placement test. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: ART 360 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A hands-on, professional experience in cultural mediation and museum education. Interns observe how collections are managed at their host institution, conduct individual research, participate in giving guided tours and in organizing events and activities. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect weekly reports, one paper and a special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Museum and gallery internships require some Saturday hours. Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs onsite, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments) and full-time status with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Admission requirements: student's CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test. Public transport costs may apply.
Avant-Garde and Modernist Art (1900-1950)
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 370 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 366 L Avant-Garde and Modernist Art (1900-1950)
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Modern art in Europe and America in the first half of the 20th century. Picasso, Matisse, Kirchner, Duchamp, Boccioni, De Chirico, Ernst, Magritte, Pollock. After reviewing the artistic and cultural revolutions of the previous half-century, we explore Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Dada, Metaphysical painting, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Dada, with a particular focus on the pre-World War II historical avant-gardes. What was so revolutionary about their ideas, methods, and artistic expressions? What were they reacting against or promoting, and what was the impact on art of the two world wars that traumatized the first half of the 20th century and beyond?
Avant-Garde and Modernist Art (1900-1950)
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 370 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 366 L Avant-Garde and Modernist Art (1900-1950)
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Modern art in Europe and America in the first half of the 20th century. Picasso, Matisse, Kirchner, Duchamp, Boccioni, De Chirico, Ernst, Magritte, Pollock. After reviewing the artistic and cultural revolutions of the previous half-century, we explore Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Dada, Metaphysical painting, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Dada, with a particular focus on the pre-World War II historical avant-gardes. What was so revolutionary about their ideas, methods, and artistic expressions? What were they reacting against or promoting, and what was the impact on art of the two world wars that traumatized the first half of the 20th century and beyond?
Contemporary Art
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
LdM Course code: ART 375 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 350 L Contemporary Art
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History and Visual Culture
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: Pollock, Rothko, Dubuffet, Rauschenberg, Giacometti, Bacon, Warhol, Morris, Kosuth, Abramovic, Richter, Basquiat, Hirst, Banksy: a wide-ranging exploration of the most significant figures and stylistic trends in late 20th-century art. We investigate the interdisciplinary nature of the contemporary art world, firmly placing artistic production in its social, political and philosophical context, and examine how contemporary artistic languages and the art business interrelate. Topics include Abstract Expressionism, Informal art, Neo-Dada, Minimalism, Site-Specific Art, Conceptualism, Neo-Expressionism, and Graffiti and Street Art. Develops students’ aptitude for independent, critical thinking and research.
Principles of Microeconomics
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 178 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 103L Principles of Microeconomics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: How do individuals and businesses “behave” economically? How do the markets work? Economic analysis is an essential tool for understanding social phenomena, and we look at the basics of economic ways of thinking, with the help of economic theory and specific analytical methods and assumptions. We explore microeconomic languages, methods and modeling; the production process and market strategies for individual businesses; consumer theory and how economists model individual behavior; and how the competitive and non-competitive markets works. Case studies and the analysis of specific economic policies relevant to our more general topics provide useful context and show how theory works on the ground. Useful for students in the applied social sciences, and an essential foundation for further studies in Economics and Business.
Principles of Macroeconomics
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or equivalent
Notes: Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 104 L Principles of Macroeconomics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: What does it mean for a country to be in a recession? How important is the national debt, and why does it seem to be more of a problem for some nations than others? How are public health and social welfare related to macroeconomic questions? Compared to human demand, the resources necessary for producing goods and services are always limited, and Economics studies how we make choices in conditions of scarcity. We explore how these choices are made on a large scale, such as that of a city, state, country, continent, or the entire planet. How governments develop economic policies, and how these choices are modeled and studied by economists. Topics include growth vs. stagnancy/contraction, business cycles, inflation and deflation, and unemployment.
Principles of Macroeconomics
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or equivalent
Notes: Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 104 L Principles of Macroeconomics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: What does it mean for a country to be in a recession? How important is the national debt, and why does it seem to be more of a problem for some nations than others? How are public health and social welfare related to macroeconomic questions? Compared to human demand, the resources necessary for producing goods and services are always limited, and Economics studies how we make choices in conditions of scarcity. We explore how these choices are made on a large scale, such as that of a city, state, country, continent, or the entire planet. How governments develop economic policies, and how these choices are modeled and studied by economists. Topics include growth vs. stagnancy/contraction, business cycles, inflation and deflation, and unemployment.
Foundations of Management
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201a
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Corporate Social Responsibility
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201a
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 200 N Corporate Social Responsibility
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Corporate social responsibility (or CSR) refers to companies’ need to ensure that business success goes hand in hand with policies that safeguard and promote the health and welfare of local communities and society at large. But who is “responsible” for corporate social responsibility? Individual workers, specific departments, or companies as a whole? How can corporations impact the world, both positively and negatively? CSR is intricately linked to the concept of sustainability, or our ability to reconcile human activity with the planet’s long-term well-being, and we focus on the benefits of making a company “sustainable.” Topics include the frameworks, contexts, and processes of ethical decision-making, environmental ethics, NGOs, auditing and social performance reporting, and stake-holder management.
Corporate Social Responsibility
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 200 N Corporate Social Responsibility
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Corporate social responsibility (or CSR) refers to companies’ need to ensure that business success goes hand in hand with policies that safeguard and promote the health and welfare of local communities and society at large. But who is “responsible” for corporate social responsibility? Individual workers, specific departments, or companies as a whole? How can corporations impact the world, both positively and negatively? CSR is intricately linked to the concept of sustainability, or our ability to reconcile human activity with the planet’s long-term well-being, and we focus on the benefits of making a company “sustainable.” Topics include the frameworks, contexts, and processes of ethical decision-making, environmental ethics, NGOs, auditing and social performance reporting, and stake-holder management.
Corporate Social Responsibility
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 200 N Corporate Social Responsibility
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: Corporate social responsibility (or CSR) refers to companies’ need to ensure that business success goes hand in hand with policies that safeguard and promote the health and welfare of local communities and society at large. But who is “responsible” for corporate social responsibility? Individual workers, specific departments, or companies as a whole? How can corporations impact the world, both positively and negatively? CSR is intricately linked to the concept of sustainability, or our ability to reconcile human activity with the planet’s long-term well-being, and we focus on the benefits of making a company “sustainable.” Topics include the frameworks, contexts, and processes of ethical decision-making, environmental ethics, NGOs, auditing and social performance reporting, and stake-holder management.
Corporate Social Responsibility
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 200 N Corporate Social Responsibility
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Corporate social responsibility (or CSR) refers to companies’ need to ensure that business success goes hand in hand with policies that safeguard and promote the health and welfare of local communities and society at large. But who is “responsible” for corporate social responsibility? Individual workers, specific departments, or companies as a whole? How can corporations impact the world, both positively and negatively? CSR is intricately linked to the concept of sustainability, or our ability to reconcile human activity with the planet’s long-term well-being, and we focus on the benefits of making a company “sustainable.” Topics include the frameworks, contexts, and processes of ethical decision-making, environmental ethics, NGOs, auditing and social performance reporting, and stake-holder management.
Principles of Marketing
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202a
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Hack
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
LdM Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Finance
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Hack
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202a
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203a
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 204a
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
China's Development and the Global Shift
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: None; Recommended: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 240 F
Dual Listing: POL 240 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 306 L China's Development & the Global Shift
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Why is China so central to the current world economy? Is its growth rate sustainable? Can the Chinese model be exported, and if so, what are its short and long-term costs? Understanding the history of Chinese economic reform, its political, environmental, and social context, and its implications is crucial to understanding the contemporary world. We explore the mechanisms and consequences of modern Chinese economic development and China’s role in the global economy. Our focus will be on the period following 1978, when China began its dramatic transformation from a planned to a market economy. Major topics and themes include the historical and institutional background of modern China, the country’s geopolitical “rise,” and key foreign relations issues.
China's Development and the Global Shift
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: None; Recommended: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 240 F
Dual Listing: POL 240 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 306 L China's Development & the Global Shift
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Morante
Description: Why is China so central to the current world economy? Is its growth rate sustainable? Can the Chinese model be exported, and if so, what are its short and long-term costs? Understanding the history of Chinese economic reform, its political, environmental, and social context, and its implications is crucial to understanding the contemporary world. We explore the mechanisms and consequences of modern Chinese economic development and China’s role in the global economy. Our focus will be on the period following 1978, when China began its dramatic transformation from a planned to a market economy. Major topics and themes include the historical and institutional background of modern China, the country’s geopolitical “rise,” and key foreign relations issues.
China's Development and the Global Shift
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: None; Recommended: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 240 F
Dual Listing: POL 240 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 306 L China's Development & the Global Shift
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: Why is China so central to the current world economy? Is its growth rate sustainable? Can the Chinese model be exported, and if so, what are its short and long-term costs? Understanding the history of Chinese economic reform, its political, environmental, and social context, and its implications is crucial to understanding the contemporary world. We explore the mechanisms and consequences of modern Chinese economic development and China’s role in the global economy. Our focus will be on the period following 1978, when China began its dramatic transformation from a planned to a market economy. Major topics and themes include the historical and institutional background of modern China, the country’s geopolitical “rise,” and key foreign relations issues.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to FRI 12:00 NOON-2:45 PM
Section: 403
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: fieldtrip fee required
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: fieldtrip fee required
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: fieldtrip fee required
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 204
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: fieldtrip fee required
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 205
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: fieldtrip fee required
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 206
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: fieldtrip fee required
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Eco
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 302
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: Theoretical course only.
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: Theoretical course only.
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 103
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Notes: Theoretical course only.
LdM Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 300 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Sustainability: Science, Political Economy and Business
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science or BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 259 F
Dual Listing: POL 259 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 259 N Sustain: Sci, Political Econ & Bus
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: The word “sustainability” seems to be everywhere these days. But how has this concept evolved over time? What are the fundamental ideas and theories that support it, and what are its scientific, technological, and economic dimensions? In examining these questions, we look closely at the roles of various stakeholders, such as governments, NGOs and businesses, in promoting a more sustainable society. There are also those who have opposed or impeded sustainable practices, and we explore how they have done so and their reasons, both stated and otherwise. Students develop their own sustainability-based project concerning a specific field of their choice.
Sustainability: Science, Political Economy and Business
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science or BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 259 F
Dual Listing: POL 259 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 259 N Sustain: Sci, Political Econ & Bus
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: The word “sustainability” seems to be everywhere these days. But how has this concept evolved over time? What are the fundamental ideas and theories that support it, and what are its scientific, technological, and economic dimensions? In examining these questions, we look closely at the roles of various stakeholders, such as governments, NGOs and businesses, in promoting a more sustainable society. There are also those who have opposed or impeded sustainable practices, and we explore how they have done so and their reasons, both stated and otherwise. Students develop their own sustainability-based project concerning a specific field of their choice.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: ICOM 304L Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: BUS 283 F
Dual Listing: SOC 283 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 183 L Made in Italy: A culture of Excellence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: “Made in Italy” symbolizes superlative quality. Home to iconic labels, brands, and craftsmanship, Italy is known for both its historical legacy and present-day excellence in a variety of fields. Through the fields of cuisine, fashion, industrial and architectural design, and more, we explore how expertise has been maintained and innovation promoted. Then we connect the distinctly Italian creative process with patterns of continuity and change in Italian society, to understand how the "Made in Italy" phenomenon has impacted the country, particularly since World War II, and the effects of globalization. How is the “Made in Italy” label used for branding and marketing, both in Italy and abroad? Focuses may vary in order to highlight recent developments. Includes guest lectures and site visits.
Beyond Modern Capitalism: Rethinking the Global Socio-Economic Order
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalent. Recommended: BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 286 F
Dual Listing: POL 286 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 286 N Beyond Modern Capitalism
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: How has the current socio-economic order come to be? What are its origins, its most important developments, and what, if any, are the alternatives? With a critical, multidisciplinary approach, we examine the role of political, economic and social elements and forces in the evolution of the current capitalist system, fleshing out both its positive and negative aspects. We look at whether capitalism has a “sustainable” future, and investigate the feasibility of alternate models: would they be more capable of satisfying socio-economic needs in fair and equitable ways?
International Art Business
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 290 F
Dual Listing: ART 297 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An introduction to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote art-based transactions. We explore the buying and selling of works of art, both within the auction framework and elsewhere. Lectures and interactions with sector specialists help students develop their ability to identify and analyze pieces of art, access marketing opportunities, and devise effective strategies for a variety of professional roles. We specifically investigate the role of the art dealer and art administrator, as well as gain a firm understanding of the international laws and other recognized practices that regulate the field.
Consumer Behavior
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 307 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 307N Consumer Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: What determines why people buy certain things, at certain times? How can they be “encouraged” in certain directions, and how can consumers avoid being manipulated by marketing and advertising? We explore consumer behavior across a number of domains: from the cognitive biases that impact our daily decisions to the ways in which consumers are influenced by the world around them. An interdisciplinary approach that draws on concepts and materials in Behavioral Economics, Psychology, and Marketing, offering a broad introduction as well as specific analysis of case studies to illustrate general ideas and principles.
Global Business and Society
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Hack
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Global Business and Society
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Global Business and Society
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Global Business and Society
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Organizational Behavior
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 311 N Foundations of Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
Organizational Behavior
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 311 N Foundations of Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Hack
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
Organizational Behavior
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 311 N Foundations of Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
Organizational Behavior
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 311 N Foundations of Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
International Marketing
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 204
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 312 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: TBA
Room: Eco
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Morante
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
International Business Negotiation
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 130 Introduction to Business or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 322 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 N ST: Conflict Transformation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: The demand for competent, professional negotiators has never been higher. In recent decades, the rise of new commercial powers and the emergence of the Internet have drastically reshaped the global economy, making the world more interconnected and businesses more innovative and competitive. We explore and develop the skills needed to communicate and negotiate effectively in the context of international business transactions. Topics include coping with cultural differences and dealing with the challenges of today’s local and global markets. Specific case studies and practical simulations are analyzed and discussed to provide concrete examples of the concepts and theories presented.
International Business Negotiation
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 130 Introduction to Business or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 322 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 N ST: Conflict Transformation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Eco
Description: The demand for competent, professional negotiators has never been higher. In recent decades, the rise of new commercial powers and the emergence of the Internet have drastically reshaped the global economy, making the world more interconnected and businesses more innovative and competitive. We explore and develop the skills needed to communicate and negotiate effectively in the context of international business transactions. Topics include coping with cultural differences and dealing with the challenges of today’s local and global markets. Specific case studies and practical simulations are analyzed and discussed to provide concrete examples of the concepts and theories presented.
International Business Negotiation
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 130 Introduction to Business or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
LdM Course code: BUS 322 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 N ST: Conflict Transformation
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: The demand for competent, professional negotiators has never been higher. In recent decades, the rise of new commercial powers and the emergence of the Internet have drastically reshaped the global economy, making the world more interconnected and businesses more innovative and competitive. We explore and develop the skills needed to communicate and negotiate effectively in the context of international business transactions. Topics include coping with cultural differences and dealing with the challenges of today’s local and global markets. Specific case studies and practical simulations are analyzed and discussed to provide concrete examples of the concepts and theories presented.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 204
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 205
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 302
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 103
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 104
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
LdM Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Global Sales Management
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
LdM Course code: BUS 353 F
Dual Listing: FAS 353 F
Marist Code/Title: Marist Equivalent Pending
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Developing sales management skills is key to increased performance and profitability for any business. This course focuses on a study of all facets of sales management, from estimating sales potential and forecasting sales to interfacing with company functions in management of the supply chain. Students learn essential tools needed in manning territories and supervising sales team including training and motivating the sales force. Effective communication and understanding diverse channels of distribution are covered.
Marketing / Event Planning Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / PR / Event Planning majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: Min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: BUS 367 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 367 N Business Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience at an event management company. Interns participate in activities including managing actual events, assisting vendors with site visits and clients, social media marketing campaigns, designing marketing materials, analyzing brand image, market appeal and customer projections, and clerical and administrative work as required. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades, assigned by the faculty supervisor, reflect weekly reports, one paper and one special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs on-site, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments). Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent, and a writing sample. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of term. Public transport costs may apply.
Marketing / Event Planning Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing/PR/Event Planning majors of junior standing w. at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Italian fluency recommended but not required.
Notes: Requires min. 135 internship hrs and full-time status (min. 15 cr). Placement limited/subject to change. Admission requirements: CV, 2 letters of reference, formal letter of intent, writing sample, due by application deadline. Acceptance subject to onsite interview during first week of term. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: BUS 367 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 367 N Business Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience at an event management company. Interns participate in activities including managing actual events, assisting vendors with site visits and clients, social media marketing campaigns, designing marketing materials, analyzing brand image, market appeal and customer projections, and clerical and administrative work as required. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades, assigned by the faculty supervisor, reflect weekly reports, one paper and one special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs onsite, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments), and full-time status with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent, and a writing sample. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during first week of term. Public transport costs may apply.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: BUS 369 F
Dual Listing: COM 370 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, one paper and one special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs on-site, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments). Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term. Public transport costs may apply.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography and video editing skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required.
Notes: Requires min. 135 internship hrs and full-time status (min. 15 cr). Placement limited/subject to change. Admission: CV, 2 reference lett., formal lett. of intent, writing & mktng samples (blog writing, social m. campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos), by application deadline. Acceptance upon interview on arrival. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: BUS 369 F
Dual Listing: COM 370 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, one paper and one special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs onsite, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments), and full-time status with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term. Public transport costs may apply.
Global Financial Markets
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 380 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Global Financial Markets
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 380 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Global Financial Markets
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 380 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Global Financial Markets
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
LdM Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 380 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Operations Management
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
LdM Course code: BUS 388 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 388N Foundations of Operations Management
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Effective operations management is crucial in the industrial, service, and other sectors. We investigate good practices and incisive methodologies useful in these and other professional contexts: quantitative decision-making techniques, forecasting, planning techniques for managing capacities, locations, and processes, resource and materials planning, and the design of job and work measurement systems. Other key topics include inventory systems, models and quality-control methods.
Speaking in Public
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Nothing is more important in achieving life and career goals as learning how to communicate in ways that make you understood and credible. That’s easy to say, but not easy to do, because almost no one is born with those skills. In fact, speaking in front of others is one of humankind’s most powerful fears. This course provides real-life skills to reduce performance anxiety, and how to engage an audience with your body language, as well as your words; how to read an audience and powerfully project your thoughts and emotions.
Speaking in Public
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Nothing is more important in achieving life and career goals as learning how to communicate in ways that make you understood and credible. That’s easy to say, but not easy to do, because almost no one is born with those skills. In fact, speaking in front of others is one of humankind’s most powerful fears. This course provides real-life skills to reduce performance anxiety, and how to engage an audience with your body language, as well as your words; how to read an audience and powerfully project your thoughts and emotions.
Speaking in Public
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: Nothing is more important in achieving life and career goals as learning how to communicate in ways that make you understood and credible. That’s easy to say, but not easy to do, because almost no one is born with those skills. In fact, speaking in front of others is one of humankind’s most powerful fears. This course provides real-life skills to reduce performance anxiety, and how to engage an audience with your body language, as well as your words; how to read an audience and powerfully project your thoughts and emotions.
Speaking in Public
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Nothing is more important in achieving life and career goals as learning how to communicate in ways that make you understood and credible. That’s easy to say, but not easy to do, because almost no one is born with those skills. In fact, speaking in front of others is one of humankind’s most powerful fears. This course provides real-life skills to reduce performance anxiety, and how to engage an audience with your body language, as well as your words; how to read an audience and powerfully project your thoughts and emotions.
Speaking in Public
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 102
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Nothing is more important in achieving life and career goals as learning how to communicate in ways that make you understood and credible. That’s easy to say, but not easy to do, because almost no one is born with those skills. In fact, speaking in front of others is one of humankind’s most powerful fears. This course provides real-life skills to reduce performance anxiety, and how to engage an audience with your body language, as well as your words; how to read an audience and powerfully project your thoughts and emotions.
Introduction to Communications
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 130 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, types, and effects of communication. We get to know the basics communicative categories (interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, cultural) and explore how specific contexts affect its forms. What ethical issues are at stake in the world of communications, and what global opportunities and challenges does it offer? How are new technologies affecting the way we think about communications, and the types of professional opportunities available? Develops critical thinking and writing skills, as well as confidence and effectiveness in group work and presentations.
Introduction to Communications
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 130 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: The essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, types, and effects of communication. We get to know the basics communicative categories (interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, cultural) and explore how specific contexts affect its forms. What ethical issues are at stake in the world of communications, and what global opportunities and challenges does it offer? How are new technologies affecting the way we think about communications, and the types of professional opportunities available? Develops critical thinking and writing skills, as well as confidence and effectiveness in group work and presentations.
New Media: Communication in the Digital Age
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 182 F
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 311 L Communication Revolution
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: “Mass media” have existed for centuries, but what does the term signify today? In decades past, they consisted of physical, paper newspapers, radio, and television; but the digital age has introduced new devices for receiving and sharing information (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual locations (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms) that are supposedly shaped around our desires and interests, but which we often come to perceive as imposed “needs.” We explore the causes and effects of the digital revolution, the features and functions of the principal digital communications devices (and sites), and how they have impacted us as citizens, artists, professionals, and individuals.
New Media: Communication in the Digital Age
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 182 F
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 311 L Communication Revolution
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: “Mass media” have existed for centuries, but what does the term signify today? In decades past, they consisted of physical, paper newspapers, radio, and television; but the digital age has introduced new devices for receiving and sharing information (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual locations (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms) that are supposedly shaped around our desires and interests, but which we often come to perceive as imposed “needs.” We explore the causes and effects of the digital revolution, the features and functions of the principal digital communications devices (and sites), and how they have impacted us as citizens, artists, professionals, and individuals.
Advertising Principles
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 204 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 220 L Intro to Strategic Advertising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Advertising is far more than just organizing images into a commercial. Every ad on the Internet, TV, or in print is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular, “target” audience, aiming to create a positive perception of the product in the consumer’s mind. We explore the theory and practice of contemporary advertising: the media and graphic strategies used to deliver it, the philosophy behind it, its impact on the economy and consumer behavior, and current advertising trends from a creative and marketing standpoint. What makes for successful advertising? We also gauge the impact of stereotypes in advertising, and society’s reaction to them.
Advertising Principles
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 204 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 220 L Intro to Strategic Advertising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Advertising is far more than just organizing images into a commercial. Every ad on the Internet, TV, or in print is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular, “target” audience, aiming to create a positive perception of the product in the consumer’s mind. We explore the theory and practice of contemporary advertising: the media and graphic strategies used to deliver it, the philosophy behind it, its impact on the economy and consumer behavior, and current advertising trends from a creative and marketing standpoint. What makes for successful advertising? We also gauge the impact of stereotypes in advertising, and society’s reaction to them.
Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication: Bridging the Borders of Difference
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 205 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee that people are able to effectively express themselves in ways that are fully understood. In a relentlessly globalizing world, understanding how to appreciate and anticipate social and cultural differences has never been more important for interpersonal communication. This course explores and explains how those differences can be overcome, especially the cultural obstacles that so often create miscommunication and mistrust; everything from the influence of culture on personal identity, differing conceptions and norms of personal space, rituals, speech patterns, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication: Bridging the Borders of Difference
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 205 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee that people are able to effectively express themselves in ways that are fully understood. In a relentlessly globalizing world, understanding how to appreciate and anticipate social and cultural differences has never been more important for interpersonal communication. This course explores and explains how those differences can be overcome, especially the cultural obstacles that so often create miscommunication and mistrust; everything from the influence of culture on personal identity, differing conceptions and norms of personal space, rituals, speech patterns, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication: Bridging the Borders of Difference
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 205 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Levi
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee that people are able to effectively express themselves in ways that are fully understood. In a relentlessly globalizing world, understanding how to appreciate and anticipate social and cultural differences has never been more important for interpersonal communication. This course explores and explains how those differences can be overcome, especially the cultural obstacles that so often create miscommunication and mistrust; everything from the influence of culture on personal identity, differing conceptions and norms of personal space, rituals, speech patterns, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication: Bridging the Borders of Difference
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 205 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee that people are able to effectively express themselves in ways that are fully understood. In a relentlessly globalizing world, understanding how to appreciate and anticipate social and cultural differences has never been more important for interpersonal communication. This course explores and explains how those differences can be overcome, especially the cultural obstacles that so often create miscommunication and mistrust; everything from the influence of culture on personal identity, differing conceptions and norms of personal space, rituals, speech patterns, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication: Bridging the Borders of Difference
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 205 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee that people are able to effectively express themselves in ways that are fully understood. In a relentlessly globalizing world, understanding how to appreciate and anticipate social and cultural differences has never been more important for interpersonal communication. This course explores and explains how those differences can be overcome, especially the cultural obstacles that so often create miscommunication and mistrust; everything from the influence of culture on personal identity, differing conceptions and norms of personal space, rituals, speech patterns, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
The Body Speaks: The Power of Non-Verbal Communication
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 212 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: How we physically present ourselves, our Body Language, is a critical element of how we are perceived in every aspect of our personal and professional lives. The ability to speak effectively in public is undeniably important, but doing so in a way that communicates the same emotional or intellectual message is equally important. Your tone of voice, how you use your hands and your ability to make eye contact say as much about you and the message you hope to convey as the words you use. In this class, you will learn and practice techniques that will help you project confidence as well as greater personal energy in all of your interpersonal interactions.
The Body Speaks: The Power of Non-Verbal Communication
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 212 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: How we physically present ourselves, our Body Language, is a critical element of how we are perceived in every aspect of our personal and professional lives. The ability to speak effectively in public is undeniably important, but doing so in a way that communicates the same emotional or intellectual message is equally important. Your tone of voice, how you use your hands and your ability to make eye contact say as much about you and the message you hope to convey as the words you use. In this class, you will learn and practice techniques that will help you project confidence as well as greater personal energy in all of your interpersonal interactions.
The Body Speaks: The Power of Non-Verbal Communication
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 212 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: How we physically present ourselves, our Body Language, is a critical element of how we are perceived in every aspect of our personal and professional lives. The ability to speak effectively in public is undeniably important, but doing so in a way that communicates the same emotional or intellectual message is equally important. Your tone of voice, how you use your hands and your ability to make eye contact say as much about you and the message you hope to convey as the words you use. In this class, you will learn and practice techniques that will help you project confidence as well as greater personal energy in all of your interpersonal interactions.
Food Writing
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: WRI 150 Writing for College, or equivalent.
LdM Course code: COM 216 F
Dual Listing: IGC 216 F WRI 216 F
Marist Code/Title: IENG 216 L Food Writing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: An introduction to the full spectrum of writing about what we eat: reviews, articles, blogs, books, menus, social media, essays. How to craft vivid descriptions of taste and place. We explore culinary writing through different types of media, including text, photos, video and audio. Students experiment with and develop a set of observational skills that engage and exploit all five senses, as well as stylistic techniques for writing about food in an efficient, concise, and captivating way.
Food Writing
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: WRI 150 Writing for College, or equivalent.
Notes: Theoretical course only
LdM Course code: COM 216 F
Dual Listing: IGC 216 F WRI 216 F
Marist Code/Title: IENG 216 L Food Writing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: An introduction to the full spectrum of writing about what we eat: reviews, articles, blogs, books, menus, social media, essays. How to craft vivid descriptions of taste and place. We explore culinary writing through different types of media, including text, photos, video and audio. Students experiment with and develop a set of observational skills that engage and exploit all five senses, as well as stylistic techniques for writing about food in an efficient, concise, and captivating way.
Communications Research Methods
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communication, or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 225 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 200 L Communication Res Methods
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Knowing how to conduct research is just as important as knowing what to research. We explore a range of methods for carrying out communications research in both academic and professional settings. Finding information, evaluating it, and drawing conclusions that have value for communications issues in the real world. Students learn the fundamentals of research design and strategy, source identification and data gathering, and types of qualitative and quantitative analysis.
Media Ethics in the Techno Age
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Media’s rapid evolution has not only revolutionized the way we receive information, it has also changed the century-old rules and norms that govern the content it carries. Is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there ethical rules for journalists or media companies? And if so, who makes them? As technology literally explodes with innovations in Social Media and Artificial Intelligence, is a universal understanding of Media’s ethical responsibility even possible? This course explores how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence on the new frontier of mass communication.
Media Ethics in the Techno Age
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Media’s rapid evolution has not only revolutionized the way we receive information, it has also changed the century-old rules and norms that govern the content it carries. Is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there ethical rules for journalists or media companies? And if so, who makes them? As technology literally explodes with innovations in Social Media and Artificial Intelligence, is a universal understanding of Media’s ethical responsibility even possible? This course explores how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence on the new frontier of mass communication.
Media Ethics in the Techno Age
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: Media’s rapid evolution has not only revolutionized the way we receive information, it has also changed the century-old rules and norms that govern the content it carries. Is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there ethical rules for journalists or media companies? And if so, who makes them? As technology literally explodes with innovations in Social Media and Artificial Intelligence, is a universal understanding of Media’s ethical responsibility even possible? This course explores how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence on the new frontier of mass communication.
Media Ethics in the Techno Age
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Media’s rapid evolution has not only revolutionized the way we receive information, it has also changed the century-old rules and norms that govern the content it carries. Is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there ethical rules for journalists or media companies? And if so, who makes them? As technology literally explodes with innovations in Social Media and Artificial Intelligence, is a universal understanding of Media’s ethical responsibility even possible? This course explores how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence on the new frontier of mass communication.
Media's Evolving Role in Modern Society
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: incl. separate workshops (mandatory if enrolled in the 'Applied Integrated Media Certificate' Program)
LdM Course code: COM 249 F
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 320 L History of Electronic Media
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: Media was born of the most basic human need, to communicate. No matter how much technology changes, or how it works and looks, the ability to connect people, information and ideas remains the only enduring reason for its existence. This course explains how New and Legacy Media’s many parts: Journalism, Advertising, Public Relations, Sports, entertainment and informational content all interact with each other, and the culture and society in which they exist. Students will also learn about the financial, political and economic realities to which all commercial media are subject, and how they influence and define the global society.
Media's Evolving Role in Modern Society
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: incl. separate workshops (mandatory if enrolled in the 'Applied Integrated Media Certificate' Program)
LdM Course code: COM 249 F
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 320 L History of Electronic Media
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: Media was born of the most basic human need, to communicate. No matter how much technology changes, or how it works and looks, the ability to connect people, information and ideas remains the only enduring reason for its existence. This course explains how New and Legacy Media’s many parts: Journalism, Advertising, Public Relations, Sports, entertainment and informational content all interact with each other, and the culture and society in which they exist. Students will also learn about the financial, political and economic realities to which all commercial media are subject, and how they influence and define the global society.
The World Changing Convergence of Media and Technology
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: incl. separate workshops (mandatory if enrolled in the 'Applied Integrated Media Certificate' Program)
LdM Course code: COM 250 F
Marist Code/Title: IMDA 250 L The Convergence of Media & Technology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: The explosive evolution of technology has completely rearranged the Media and Communications landscape, destroying legendary media empires and giving rise to new ones. Students will learn how brands and technologies that didn’t exist when they were born, are disrupting and redefining global cultural, societal and financial structures, creating polarization and disturbing changes in societal norms. Most importantly, it will explore the critical role and ethical responsibilities of individuals in creating new guidelines for media and the ever evolving technologies that deliver its news, information and entertainment to the global community.
The World Changing Convergence of Media and Technology
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: incl. separate workshops (mandatory if enrolled in the 'Applied Integrated Media Certificate' Program)
LdM Course code: COM 250 F
Marist Code/Title: IMDA 250 L The Convergence of Media & Technology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: The explosive evolution of technology has completely rearranged the Media and Communications landscape, destroying legendary media empires and giving rise to new ones. Students will learn how brands and technologies that didn’t exist when they were born, are disrupting and redefining global cultural, societal and financial structures, creating polarization and disturbing changes in societal norms. Most importantly, it will explore the critical role and ethical responsibilities of individuals in creating new guidelines for media and the ever evolving technologies that deliver its news, information and entertainment to the global community.
Food Marketing & Communication
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent; sophomore standing. A prior course in Communications is recommended.
Notes: Theoretical course only
LdM Course code: COM 253 F
Dual Listing: IGC 253 F
Marist Code/Title: ICOM 253 L Food Marketing & Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: An introduction to the fundamental operational and strategic dynamics that shape marketing and communications in the agri-food industry. We compare and contrast different gastronomic cultures and traditions, comparing and contrasting the food marketing strategies related to them. Students examine and analyze case studies and success stories, ranging from small-scale producers to multinational companies, investigating the importance of geographical and social context in communicating food from a variety of perspectives. They then implement the tools and methodologies we’ve covered, keeping in mind both client and consumer, to design and develop an integrated marketing and communication plan for an agri-food business.
Food Marketing & Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent; sophomore standing. A prior course in Communications is recommended.
Notes: Lecture course only
LdM Course code: COM 253 F
Dual Listing: IGC 253 F
Marist Code/Title: ICOM 253 L Food Marketing & Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: An introduction to the fundamental operational and strategic dynamics that shape marketing and communications in the agri-food industry. We compare and contrast different gastronomic cultures and traditions, comparing and contrasting the food marketing strategies related to them. Students examine and analyze case studies and success stories, ranging from small-scale producers to multinational companies, investigating the importance of geographical and social context in communicating food from a variety of perspectives. They then implement the tools and methodologies we’ve covered, keeping in mind both client and consumer, to design and develop an integrated marketing and communication plan for an agri-food business.
Food Marketing & Communication
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent; sophomore standing. A prior course in Communications is recommended.
Notes: Theoretical course only
LdM Course code: COM 253 F
Dual Listing: IGC 253 F
Marist Code/Title: ICOM 253 L Food Marketing & Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: An introduction to the fundamental operational and strategic dynamics that shape marketing and communications in the agri-food industry. We compare and contrast different gastronomic cultures and traditions, comparing and contrasting the food marketing strategies related to them. Students examine and analyze case studies and success stories, ranging from small-scale producers to multinational companies, investigating the importance of geographical and social context in communicating food from a variety of perspectives. They then implement the tools and methodologies we’ve covered, keeping in mind both client and consumer, to design and develop an integrated marketing and communication plan for an agri-food business.
The Power of Interpersonal Communication
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 265 F
Marist Code/Title: Marist course equivalent pending
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Interpersonal communication is the soul of any human interaction. How you represent yourself, and your message, is the single most important factor in whether you succeed or fail in just about every aspect of your personal, social or professional life. It's so essential that it transcends the borders of language, politics and culture. This course deeply explores foundational concepts such as cultural bias, perception and norms, conflict resolution and power dynamics. Most of all, it will demonstrate how skills like: story telling, empathetic listening, recognizing non-verbal cues and constructively harnessing your emotions will make you a powerful and effective communicator in every aspect of your personal and professional life.
The Power of Interpersonal Communication
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 265 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 203L Interpersonal Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Interpersonal communication is the soul of any human interaction. How you represent yourself, and your message, is the single most important factor in whether you succeed or fail in just about every aspect of your personal, social or professional life. It's so essential that it transcends the borders of language, politics and culture. This course deeply explores foundational concepts such as cultural bias, perception and norms, conflict resolution and power dynamics. Most of all, it will demonstrate how skills like: story telling, empathetic listening, recognizing non-verbal cues and constructively harnessing your emotions will make you a powerful and effective communicator in every aspect of your personal and professional life.
The Power of Interpersonal Communication
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: incl. separate workshops (mandatory if enrolled in the 'Applied Integrated Media Certificate' Program)
LdM Course code: COM 265 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 203L Interpersonal Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Interpersonal communication is the soul of any human interaction. How you represent yourself, and your message, is the single most important factor in whether you succeed or fail in just about every aspect of your personal, social or professional life. It's so essential that it transcends the borders of language, politics and culture. This course deeply explores foundational concepts such as cultural bias, perception and norms, conflict resolution and power dynamics. Most of all, it will demonstrate how skills like: story telling, empathetic listening, recognizing non-verbal cues and constructively harnessing your emotions will make you a powerful and effective communicator in every aspect of your personal and professional life.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: ICOM 304L Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 277 F
Dual Listing: ART 277 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 294 L ART: Special Topics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Eco
Description: What do Vespa scooters, Vittorio De Sica's neorealist movies, Gucci’s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti’s “Superleggera” chair, Giuseppe Cavalli’s photos of southern Italian trulli, and Alberto Burri’s canvases spattered with tar have in common? Is there such thing as a shared “Italian” visual culture? We explore this question with a communications-based approach to visual culture in post-World War II Italy. Our subjects are works of contemporary art and design, conceived as communicators of cultural messages that blur the often-artificial distinction between these two fields. Case studies highlight how designers, directors, and artists influenced one another and even collaborated directly, instances in which theory took a back seat to process and context. Students will find inspiration in these concrete paths to innovation.
Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
LdM Course code: COM 277 F
Dual Listing: ART 277 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 294 L ART: Special Topics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: What do Vespa scooters, Vittorio De Sica's neorealist movies, Gucci’s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti’s “Superleggera” chair, Giuseppe Cavalli’s photos of southern Italian trulli, and Alberto Burri’s canvases spattered with tar have in common? Is there such thing as a shared “Italian” visual culture? We explore this question with a communications-based approach to visual culture in post-World War II Italy. Our subjects are works of contemporary art and design, conceived as communicators of cultural messages that blur the often-artificial distinction between these two fields. Case studies highlight how designers, directors, and artists influenced one another and even collaborated directly, instances in which theory took a back seat to process and context. Students will find inspiration in these concrete paths to innovation.
The Art of Persuasion, from Antiquity to Modern Times
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
LdM Course code: COM 289 F
Dual Listing: ANC 289 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 302L Persuasion
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Since ancient times, the art of persuasive speaking has empowered people and offered tools to succeed in social, political and judicial contexts. The course will look into the techniques that have made language powerful through the ages, in both Greco-Roman antiquity and modern political discourse. Both linguistic and non-linguistic strategies will be analyzed: creation of arguments, choice of vocabulary, use of proof and demonstrative strategies, performance, construction of the political self, weakening of the opponent. Comparisons between ancient and modern rhetorical strategies will be constantly drawn. During the interactive sessions, the students will also actively apply the techniques which have been studied during the course. Notably, they will learn to build and deliver effective persuasive speeches and to confront their fellow classmates in debates on mostly fictitious model cases.
Public Relations
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 300 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: What are we referring to when we speak of “public relations”? What does someone in PR do, and how have jobs in this sector changed over the decades? We explore PR theory, as well as the tools and strategies for a successful public relations campaign (planning, issue analysis, research methods and goals). Through case studies and exercises, we familiarize ourselves with the fields in which PR professionals operate: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. The future of the field, and how new technologies may contribute to more effective, original PR solutions
Public Relations
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 300 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: What are we referring to when we speak of “public relations”? What does someone in PR do, and how have jobs in this sector changed over the decades? We explore PR theory, as well as the tools and strategies for a successful public relations campaign (planning, issue analysis, research methods and goals). Through case studies and exercises, we familiarize ourselves with the fields in which PR professionals operate: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. The future of the field, and how new technologies may contribute to more effective, original PR solutions
Public Relations
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 300 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What are we referring to when we speak of “public relations”? What does someone in PR do, and how have jobs in this sector changed over the decades? We explore PR theory, as well as the tools and strategies for a successful public relations campaign (planning, issue analysis, research methods and goals). Through case studies and exercises, we familiarize ourselves with the fields in which PR professionals operate: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. The future of the field, and how new technologies may contribute to more effective, original PR solutions
War and Media
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 301 F
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: If truth is the first casualty of war, the chief culprit in distorting wartime truth has historically been the media. From the use of disinformation to fan the flames of conflict, to its role in motivating combatants and their respective home fronts, media has been as essential to war as the weapons with which it has been fought. That destructive power has exponentially multiplied as global news networks and Artificial Intelligence project images and information in seconds to audiences it would have taken weeks or months to reach in the past. This course will also cover the role of war in film, art and popular culture, the emergence of non-Western media, and the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism.
War and Media
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 301 F
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: If truth is the first casualty of war, the chief culprit in distorting wartime truth has historically been the media. From the use of disinformation to fan the flames of conflict, to its role in motivating combatants and their respective home fronts, media has been as essential to war as the weapons with which it has been fought. That destructive power has exponentially multiplied as global news networks and Artificial Intelligence project images and information in seconds to audiences it would have taken weeks or months to reach in the past. This course will also cover the role of war in film, art and popular culture, the emergence of non-Western media, and the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism.
Communication and the Art of Leadership
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 304 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 304N Communication and Leadership
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Luzi
Description: The hardest human attribute to define and the easiest to recognize is leadership. Legends abound with examples of how the personal dynamism of a leader turned the tide of history. At no time in the human experience has there been a greater need for effective leadership, especially in Media and Communications. This course explores how the role of the individual, especially in times of extreme volatility, is essential to positive outcomes. We explore strategies, skills and approaches of innovative leaders, as well as examples of how a combination of compassion, charisma and intuition can create a transformative leader, capable of inspiring meaningful change.
Communication and the Art of Leadership
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 304 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 304N Communication and Leadership
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: The hardest human attribute to define and the easiest to recognize is leadership. Legends abound with examples of how the personal dynamism of a leader turned the tide of history. At no time in the human experience has there been a greater need for effective leadership, especially in Media and Communications. This course explores how the role of the individual, especially in times of extreme volatility, is essential to positive outcomes. We explore strategies, skills and approaches of innovative leaders, as well as examples of how a combination of compassion, charisma and intuition can create a transformative leader, capable of inspiring meaningful change.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: TBA
Room: Eco
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
LdM Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: IMGT 313 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Global Sports Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Technology and the evolution of media have created a global marketplace, hungry for information and entertainment, and nothing surpasses the value, power and universal appeal of sports. This course explains how sports teams and leagues work, how they attract fans and how they, and the athletes that participate, monetize one of the world’s most powerful forms of pop cultural entertainment. Students will learn how media deals, sponsorships, licensing and product endorsements propel one of the worlds truly global industries, all driven by the marketing efforts that put those components in play.
Global Sports Marketing
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201a
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: LdM at Pal. Borghese, Via de’ Giraldi 2
Room: Hack
Description: Technology and the evolution of media have created a global marketplace, hungry for information and entertainment, and nothing surpasses the value, power and universal appeal of sports. This course explains how sports teams and leagues work, how they attract fans and how they, and the athletes that participate, monetize one of the world’s most powerful forms of pop cultural entertainment. Students will learn how media deals, sponsorships, licensing and product endorsements propel one of the worlds truly global industries, all driven by the marketing efforts that put those components in play.
Global Sports Marketing
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Technology and the evolution of media have created a global marketplace, hungry for information and entertainment, and nothing surpasses the value, power and universal appeal of sports. This course explains how sports teams and leagues work, how they attract fans and how they, and the athletes that participate, monetize one of the world’s most powerful forms of pop cultural entertainment. Students will learn how media deals, sponsorships, licensing and product endorsements propel one of the worlds truly global industries, all driven by the marketing efforts that put those components in play.
Global Sports Marketing
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Technology and the evolution of media have created a global marketplace, hungry for information and entertainment, and nothing surpasses the value, power and universal appeal of sports. This course explains how sports teams and leagues work, how they attract fans and how they, and the athletes that participate, monetize one of the world’s most powerful forms of pop cultural entertainment. Students will learn how media deals, sponsorships, licensing and product endorsements propel one of the worlds truly global industries, all driven by the marketing efforts that put those components in play.
Global Sports Marketing
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 204
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Technology and the evolution of media have created a global marketplace, hungry for information and entertainment, and nothing surpasses the value, power and universal appeal of sports. This course explains how sports teams and leagues work, how they attract fans and how they, and the athletes that participate, monetize one of the world’s most powerful forms of pop cultural entertainment. Students will learn how media deals, sponsorships, licensing and product endorsements propel one of the worlds truly global industries, all driven by the marketing efforts that put those components in play.
Global Sports Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
LdM Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In an increasingly globalized economy, sports, teams, and individual players are marketed and sold around the world. How did the global sports economy arise? How are international sports brands created? We explore the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships and event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex framework of international sports and their global audiences. How does sports marketing deal with differences in marketing practices and cultures around the world? How does a global audience impact corporate sponsorships, and how do different communities react to local and global sporting events? Includes case studies of various global sporting events, which students use as a template to create their own strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Global Media Strategies
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 360 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 364 L Global Media Strategies
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: In an age in which our target market is often the world, what constitutes a winning media strategy? How can both traditional and new media be harnessed to develop captivating content through all stages of the customer relationship cycle? We examine how to develop, measure, and improve multi-channel communications strategies for acquiring new customers, retaining existing ones, encouraging repeat purchases, and building long-term, profitable relationships. Students gain familiarity with analyzing media usage habits, a key tool in discovering the best ways to reach and dialogue with new and existing customers.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: COM 370 F
Dual Listing: BUS 369 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, one paper and one special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs on-site, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments). Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term. Public transport costs may apply.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography and video editing skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required.
Notes: Requires min. 135 internship hrs and full-time status (min. 15 cr). Placement limited/subject to change. Admission: CV, 2 reference lett., formal lett. of intent, writing & mktng samples (blog writing, social m. campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos), by application deadline. Acceptance upon interview on arrival. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: COM 370 F
Dual Listing: BUS 369 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, one paper and one special project, and an overall evaluation. An average of 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs onsite, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments), and full-time status with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term. Public transport costs may apply.
Communications Internship in Italian
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Advanced Italian I (ITL 301 level) and concurrent enrollment in an Italian class (ITL/ITC). Recommended: Strong writing and communication skills.
Notes: Requires min. 135 internship hrs and full-time status (min. 15 cr). Placement limited/subject to change. Admission: CV, 2 reference letters, formal letter of intent in Italian, English writing sample, by application deadline. Acceptance upon interview + Italian language placement test on arrival. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: COM 380 F
Dual Listing: ITC 380 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 N International Communication Internship/Media Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: This internship offers students the opportunity to gain practical and professional communications experience at a local Florentine community-driven, communications agency, organization or similar establishment. Interns will have the opportunity to develop a range of skills in writing, speaking, editing, and some media management, as well as gain experience in developing new projects. An onsite supervisor and a faculty member continually monitor interns, and work will be assessed through weekly reports, a paper, a special project, and an overall evaluation. Interns are expected to commit 10-12 hours per week to their internship plus bi-weekly meetings with the Internship supervisor(s). Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs onsite, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments), and full-time status with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent in Italian, English writing sample (due by application deadline), Italian language placement test and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply.
Global Brand Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
LdM Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Palladio
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Global Brand Management
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
LdM Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Global Brand Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
LdM Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Consumer Insights and Strategic Development
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 421 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 428 L Consumer Insights/Development
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Get into the mind of the consumer. What makes people choose between different alternatives (brands, products, retailers)? How are they influenced by their cultural and socio-economic background, family, peers, or the media? We explore the behavior that consumers, groups or organizations display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services they expect to satisfy their needs, and how to use this information to best develop marketing strategies. A theoretical and practical approach within a global framework, aiming to understand what drives consumer behavior and how individuals and businesses can use this knowledge most effectively.
Global IMC Campaign Development
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 312 International Marketing; 2) COM 411 Global Brand Management or COM 360 Global Media Strategies, or equivalents
LdM Course code: COM 441 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 429 L Global Mkt Camp Devl
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Using the skills developed in previous Global Integrated Marketing Communication courses, students develop a comprehensive, insight-driven, multimedia IMC campaign. Work includes the necessary primary and secondary research to determine and analyze ideal target audiences and collect key customer feedback; the creation of a “big” campaign idea and the development of an integrated multimedia strategy based on consumer behavior research; and bringing these together with a feasible, measurable media strategy and the creative elements required to make the campaign memorable and successful.
Capping: Communications Studies
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Communications majors of senior standing
LdM Course code: COM 461 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 401 L Capping
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Morante
Description: A capping course required of all senior Communications majors. It ties together the various elements in a student’s course of study and academic experience, uniting the various sub-fields in which students have specialized and reinforcing the connections between them and the applications of these subjects in their professional future.
Education Internship
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Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Education or Child/Adolescent Psychology majors of junior standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same or related field. 3)Intermediate Italian (ITL 201 level) completed.
Notes: Requires min. 135 internship hrs and full-time status (min. 15 cr). Placement limited/subject to change. Admission requirements: CV, 2 reference letters, formal letter of intent, due by application deadline. Acceptance subject to onsite interview during first week of term. Public transport costs may apply.
LdM Course code: EDU 361 F
Marist Code/Title: EDU 361 N Education Internship
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Education
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in an Italian private school, at the pre-school, elementary, middle, or high school level. Interns perform activities that may include teaching English to children aged 3-18, and organizing lesson plans and activities for children aged 18 months-3 years. Monitoring is carried out by a faculty member and an onsite supervisor. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Requires 135 internship hours minimum (120 hrs on-site, plus 15 hrs to complete meetings and assignments), and full-time status with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student’s CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term. Public transport costs may apply.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
LdM Course code: ENV 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Perhaps never before has the environment been such a central theme in our lives. Yet it is also a potentially limitless field in which it is easy to get lost or sidetracked. We explore the major concepts and questions to provide a foundation for understanding the critical environmental issues of today and tomorrow: climate change, population growth, natural resource management, pollution, global changes in biodiversity and wildlife, habitat loss, land and coastal erosion, food production, water resources, and changing consumption and living habits. A reflection on global environmental issues within an earth systems framework that places the various pieces of the puzzle in dialogue with one another.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
LdM Course code: ENV 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Perhaps never before has the environment been such a central