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Course Schedules

On-site Courses

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For courses for the Two Italies program, please click on ‘Two Italies schedule’ on the left.
Please note that the following are tentative course schedules for enrollment purposes only.

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Sustainable Forest Management
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: AGR 190 T
Dual Listing: ENV 190 T
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 290 L Sustainable Forest Management
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Agriculture
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tina
Description: Our forests are unique: a symbol of life, and essential to our lives. They provide food, water, renewable energy, shelter, recreation, and inspiration; they are home to countless species of plants and animals, help mitigate climate change, and protect the soil. Our focus will be on temperate forests in particular, such as those in Europe and North America, conditioned by centuries of human settlement and activities. What are their principal characteristics, and how can they be successfully managed and protected to ensure their survival long into the future? Topics include tree biology, forest ecology, tree identification methodologies, and forest harvesting and protection. Field trips and hands-on activities offer students direct experience with how a forest functions, and the strategies for ensuring that it continues to prosper.
Sustainable Forest Management
TUE 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: AGR 190 T
Dual Listing: ENV 190 T
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 290 L Sustainable Forest Management
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Agriculture
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tymicha
Description: Our forests are unique: a symbol of life, and essential to our lives. They provide food, water, renewable energy, shelter, recreation, and inspiration; they are home to countless species of plants and animals, help mitigate climate change, and protect the soil. Our focus will be on temperate forests in particular, such as those in Europe and North America, conditioned by centuries of human settlement and activities. What are their principal characteristics, and how can they be successfully managed and protected to ensure their survival long into the future? Topics include tree biology, forest ecology, tree identification methodologies, and forest harvesting and protection. Field trips and hands-on activities offer students direct experience with how a forest functions, and the strategies for ensuring that it continues to prosper.
Organic Agriculture
TUE 11:00 AM-1:30 PM / THU 11:00 AM-1:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: Lecture with experiential component on field. Lab fee and/or material costs apply.
Course code: AGR 220 T
Marist Code/Title: AGR 230 L Organic Agriculture
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Agriculture
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Hours: 90
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Beatrice
Description: Organic foods have become a familiar site on both restaurant menus and supermarket shelves. But what does organic agriculture actually imply? Well, many things: respect for a farm’s unique environment and the absence of pesticides; coordination of farming elements and the rejuvenation of fields compromised by intensive agriculture; and new techniques that permit productivity, quality, and profitability, while respecting stringent legislative regulations. We explore organic agriculture from the perspective of business management, agronomy, as well as history, culture and ethics. Students also experience the process firsthand through participation in seasonal activities at local farms and facilities, including horticultural work in the spring and olive harvesting and pressing in fall. Course meets for 45 hours in fall, 60 hours in summer, and 90 hours in spring.
Archaeology Workshop
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Greek and Roman Mythology
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Greek and Roman Mythology
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: The stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes play a fundamental role in the development of Western art and literature, especially after their revival during the Renaissance. They provide a key to understanding not only the ideals and aspirations of the Roman Empire, but modern literature and psychology as well. We examine the major deities of the Greek and Roman pantheon through history, literature and archaeology. How did Greek myths influence the Roman world? What can the Iliad, Odyssey, and Roman foundation myths and sagas tell us about the relationship between myth and history? We also discuss how these myths were represented visually on ancient monuments and everyday objects, and how their stories evolved after the classical period. Includes visits to museums, monuments and/or archaeological sites.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via dell’Ariento 10/14
Room: CUCINA Lab
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via dell’Ariento 10/14
Room: CUCINA Lab
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 204
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 205
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Buontalenti
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANC 264 F
Dual Listing: IGC 264 F ANT 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 0
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Wine Roots: From Enotria to Chianti
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in Classics, Art History, or Ancient History is recommended.
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: ANC 265 F
Dual Listing: IGC 265 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 292 L ST: Wine in Ancient Italy
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Was wine as important in ancient Italy as it is today? Who drank it? Did wine have social implications beyond individual or private consumption? What was its role in ancient mystery rites and the so-called “symposium"? Wine, viticulture, and the “Greek style” of drinking spread throughout the ancient Mediterranean world, from the Hellenic lands to the Etruscans and Romans, and provides a fascinating vantage point for studying ancient civilizations. After discussing the evolution of wine production, trade and consumption in ancient Italy, we look at the place of wine in Greek mythology and religion, drinking and gender, alcoholism and drunkenness, and wine consumption as status symbol in Rome and in Etruria, then link these topics to contemporary society. In particular, ancient viticulture, aging, consumption and social practices that evolved and left their trace in today’s contemporary wine cultural landscape.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to FRI 8:30 AM-4:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: Special 6-cr course w. full day activity (incl. a 2hr break) and MON-FRI schedule. See brochure/syllabus or request separate info. Current tetanus vaccination + internat. health insurance valid abroad required. In collab. with CAMNES.
Course code: ANC 282-283 T
Dual Listing: ANT 282-283 T HIS 282-283 T
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 Archeology Field I and II
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 6
Hours: 148
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Outdoor Class
Description: An intensive, four-week journey into the world of archaeology, with a unique combination of supervised fieldwork and academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. We explore Etruscan civilization in its material culture, artistic production, and socio-political organization, while contributing to the ongoing excavation and preservation of an active site and learning fundamental archaeological techniques. Offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES), the course is held in Tuscania, one of the richest Etruscan archaeological areas. Includes weekly visits to other relevant sites, monuments and museums, in both the Tuscia region and Rome.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REST 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REL 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REL 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 288 F
Dual Listing: REL 288 F
Marist Code/Title: REL 216 L Ancient Greek Religion
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In ancient cultures, the supernatural was everywhere. How did people make contact with and represent spirits, specters, the afterlife and the netherworld, and how did these practices evolve across time and space? Our focus will be on the various aspects of magic and sorcery, including shamanism, divination, necromancy (evoking the dead), and curses (namely binding and love curses). We also examine the subject of the “restless dead” (i.e. ghosts), a privileged medium that ancient people believed allowed them to communicate with the world beyond the grave. Sources include reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets. Comparisons of ancient beliefs and practices with those of more modern cultures and folklore.
The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in Classics, Literature, or Religion.
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 306 F
Dual Listing: LIT 306 F
Marist Code/Title: LIT 306 / ENG 270 L The Age of Heroes: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid and the Origins of Western Literature/ Classics of Western Lit
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: A comparative analysis of some of the oldest, greatest literary works in Western civilization. Using the most significant chapters from the Iliad and the Odyssey, written in the 8th century BCE, we immerse ourselves in the epic, supernatural world of Homer’s heroes, the veritable “bible” of classical civilization. How did the Greeks use myths to express the archetypal values that would become the cornerstones of future generations and civilizations? How did myths function as examples of storytelling prowess, expressions of ancient cultural traditions, and basic forms of communication and instruction? Then we observe the influence of this Greek tradition on the Romans in a selection of passages from the Aeneid, Virgil’s foundational epic from the 1st century BCE.
The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: A prior course in Classics, Literature, or Religion.
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 306 F
Dual Listing: LIT 306 F
Marist Code/Title: LIT 306 / ENG 270 L The Age of Heroes: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid and the Origins of Western Literature/ Classics of Western Lit
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: A comparative analysis of some of the oldest, greatest literary works in Western civilization. Using the most significant chapters from the Iliad and the Odyssey, written in the 8th century BCE, we immerse ourselves in the epic, supernatural world of Homer’s heroes, the veritable “bible” of classical civilization. How did the Greeks use myths to express the archetypal values that would become the cornerstones of future generations and civilizations? How did myths function as examples of storytelling prowess, expressions of ancient cultural traditions, and basic forms of communication and instruction? Then we observe the influence of this Greek tradition on the Romans in a selection of passages from the Aeneid, Virgil’s foundational epic from the 1st century BCE.
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Course code: ANT 185 F
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: What can anthropological methods tell us about fashion? How are beauty, gender, and the body constructed through clothing design and visual culture? How do ancient artifacts influence designers? What is the relationship between fashion and art? Ever since fashion became the subject of academic study in the 1980s, these questions and more have come to the forefront, and their answers continue to challenge us on a daily basis. We explore anthropology’s contribution to the study of fashion as an academic discipline, and to our understanding of it as a cultural expression. Key topics include the construction of meaning in fashion and visual culture, and the interaction of fashion with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion objects.”
Archaeology Workshop
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Archaeology Workshop
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 0
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Room: Archaeology Lab
Description: A practical introduction to ancient artifact conservation and documentation. At our Archaeology Lab, students gain firsthand experience working with the 2500-year-old artefacts recently unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania in central Italy, part of our ongoing joint excavation with CAMNES. What happens to archaeological finds when they leave the dig site and reach the lab? How are they processed and assembled to help us better understand our ancient past? Under instructor guidance, students learn and participate in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage. This course also provides eligibility for our Tuscania Summer Field School, held directly at one of our active archaeological excavations.
Italian Identity Across Food and Culture
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: lecture only, no hands-on cooking component
Course code: ANT 198 F
Dual Listing: IGC 198 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 119 L Food and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: You may be what you eat, but why do you eat the way you do? Why do people make different food choices in their daily lives? What makes certain social classes avoid or value certain types of foods? Food is an important factor in how we define ourselves: people’s attitude toward it can reveal not just personal characteristics, but a broader food ideology. We explore the relationships between food’s multiple meanings and the physical acts of cooking and eating, and how food influences personal and group identity. The role of food in constructing ethnic identity, displaying religious beliefs and negotiating gender roles, and food’s ability to transmit and preserve cultures and values.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via dell’Ariento 10/14
Room: CUCINA Lab
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via dell’Ariento 10/14
Room: CUCINA Lab
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 204
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 205
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Buontalenti
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: lecture with practical cooking component. Lab fee required. May not be suitable for students with allergies or intolerances (i.e., gluten, etc.)
Course code: ANT 264 F
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F IGC 264 F
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Artusi
Description: In the fascinating setting of Florence’s Central Market, a hands–on exploration of the ancient Mediterranean’s major culinary cultures–the forerunners of modern Italian cuisine. Making use of the tools of experimental archaeology, we prepare and taste ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman and Near Eastern dishes and explore the distinction between how food was consumed, and how it was used symbolically. Topics include the social dimensions of food, a history of specific commodities, everyday eating habits and etiquette, and culinary rituals and taboos. Students also develop the manual skills associated with food preparation.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to FRI 8:30 AM-4:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: Special 6-cr course w. full day activity (incl. a 2hr break) and MON-FRI schedule. See brochure/syllabus or request separate info. Current tetanus vaccination + internat. health insurance valid abroad required. In collab. with CAMNES.
Course code: ANT 282-283 T
Dual Listing: ANC 282-283 T HIS 282-283 T
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 Archeology Field I and II
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 6
Hours: 90
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Outdoor Class
Description: An intensive, four-week journey into the world of archaeology, with a unique combination of supervised fieldwork and academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. We explore Etruscan civilization in its material culture, artistic production, and socio-political organization, while contributing to the ongoing excavation and preservation of an active site and learning fundamental archaeological techniques. Offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES), the course is held in Tuscania, one of the richest Etruscan archaeological areas. Includes weekly visits to other relevant sites, monuments and museums, in both the Tuscia region and Rome.
History of Architecture
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 165 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 110 L History of Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: The major periods and key monuments in Western architecture from antiquity to the present. Our chronological focuses include the Classical period, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, Modernism, and recent developments in contemporary artistic expression. We examine representative monuments and architects from every major period, including masters such as Ictinus, Brunelleschi, Borromini and Le Corbusier. How did architects’ concepts of beauty and their strategies for realizing their visions change, both within their own lives and from one period to another? Topics include architectural typologies, materials and construction technology, theory, city planning, and cultural contexts. Includes visits to pertinent examples of urban architecture from various periods.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: How did the visual arts in Western Europe change between ancient Greece and the end of the Middle Ages? What parts of this artistic heritage did the Renaissance masters revive and transform, and what did they discard? We get to know the principal painters, sculptors and architects, their major works, dominant themes and motifs, and the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts so essential to understanding the visual arts and their impact. Topics include the interpretation of subject and symbols, artistic techniques and styles, and public and private patronage. Onsite teaching offers students the incomparable experience of studying masterpieces firsthand. An introduction to the field that aims to foster an appreciation of art history and lay the foundations for further study.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
FULL
Course code: ART 186 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: A survey of the visual arts in Western Europe from the early 16th century to the present. We familiarize ourselves with the most important changes in artistic taste and style, and get to know the major painters, sculptors and architects and their principal work and themes. To better understand the visual arts and their impact on society over time, we also explore the major historical, philosophical, and cultural changes and contexts of the period. Our focus is on interpreting subjects and symbols, identifying different artistic techniques and styles, and recognizing the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching gives students firsthand access to major works of art and architecture, making their study all the more meaningful. An introduction to the discipline and a springboard to a greater appreciation of art and further studies in the field.
The Built Environment of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
The Built Environment of Florence
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: ART 201 F
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: The architectural history of Florence is remarkable to say the least. We survey the evolution of the city’s built environment from its origins to the present day, with a particular focus on the period between the Middle Ages and the late Renaissance (11th-17th century). How have architectural style and city planning changed, as revealed in Florence’s buildings, city walls, streets and squares? What was the relationship of the city’s physical growth to its exceptional economic, cultural, and artistic ascent in its historical prime, and to developments in the rest of Europe generally? Numerous site visits allow students to compare historical and scholarly sources with the physical evidence, and learn to “read” the stylistic as well as the material and socio-cultural histories of buildings and spaces.
20th Century Design and Architecture
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 202 F
Dual Listing: ARC 202 F
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: An introduction to the tools and methods for understanding and recognizing choices and style in architectural design, in both interior and exterior settings. We explore the work of the 19th and early 20th-century masters (up to c. 1960) who expressed their talents and aesthetic vision from the small scale of objects and interiors to the grand ideas of entire buildings, neighborhoods and cities. Given the close relationship between interior design, object design and architecture, we examine the history of these three fields beginning with the Industrial Revolution. How did politics, economics and scientific and technological discoveries impact society, art, and architecture? What drove innovation in materials and aesthetics in the past, and how has this process changed in today’s world?
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
The World of Museums: Museology
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
The World of Museums: Museology
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Course code: ART 230 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: An integrated approach to museum theory and practice. How have “the museum” and the practices associated with such a place changed over the centuries? We examine the ways and the reasons people have gathered together beautiful, precious, and bizarre objects in a variety of places, and the challenges of assembling collections for world-famous museums such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. Why is our cultural heritage of such value to society, and what are the legal and ethical issues involved in its preservation? Topics also include methods of research and documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the museum as an educational space, preventive and remedial conservation, environmental monitoring and control, and safety and storage. Specific focus on Italian and Florentine museums, which students visit and analyze according to the most innovative museological theory and practices.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 102
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 204
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 205
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 206
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What role have private and public palaces played in Florentine life over the centuries? Why were they built in certain areas at certain times, and how did styles change? We examine the function of these buildings in the city’s history between the 13th and 17th century from an interdisciplinary perspective: not only do we explore the development of architectural and artistic styles and the stories of patrons, residents, and architects, but how evolution of these buildings was connected to major social, economic, cultural, and political phenomena over five centuries of Florentine history. Includes visits to a number of the city’s palaces, allowing students to experience and study these spaces firsthand.
Italian Renaissance Art
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ART 278 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 380 L Renaissance Art
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Why did Florence become the "cradle of the Renaissance"? What made it special? How did artists like Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael come to create one of the most fascinating periods in the history of art between the 14th and 16th century? We explore this extraordinary coming-together of artistic talent, passionate interest in antiquity, civic pride, and an optimistic belief in "man as the measure of all things." A look at the period’s most important monuments, and the major artists and architects who shaped this “rebirth” of Western art. Our comparative approach emphasizes the specific cultural, philosophical, and historical contexts in which these great works were created, and the relationships between the artists and their patrons.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 280 F
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 281 F
Dual Listing: GND 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 281 F
Dual Listing: GND 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 281 F
Dual Listing: GND 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ART 286 F
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Major developments in architecture, interior design, and city planning from 1960 to the present, with a particular focus on the last two decades. How has contemporary architecture reflected changes in broader society and culture? We discuss the most important debates concerning aesthetics and theory, including the controversies surround the supposed “decline” of modernism. Students also familiarize themselves with key architects and studios, and how they have distinguished themselves and innovated with respect to their predecessors. While our perspective is global, our emphasis remains European, and on Italy in particular.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ART 286 F
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Major developments in architecture, interior design, and city planning from 1960 to the present, with a particular focus on the last two decades. How has contemporary architecture reflected changes in broader society and culture? We discuss the most important debates concerning aesthetics and theory, including the controversies surround the supposed “decline” of modernism. Students also familiarize themselves with key architects and studios, and how they have distinguished themselves and innovated with respect to their predecessors. While our perspective is global, our emphasis remains European, and on Italy in particular.
Contemporary Architecture
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ART 286 F
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Major developments in architecture, interior design, and city planning from 1960 to the present, with a particular focus on the last two decades. How has contemporary architecture reflected changes in broader society and culture? We discuss the most important debates concerning aesthetics and theory, including the controversies surround the supposed “decline” of modernism. Students also familiarize themselves with key architects and studios, and how they have distinguished themselves and innovated with respect to their predecessors. While our perspective is global, our emphasis remains European, and on Italy in particular.
International Art Business
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ART 297 F
Dual Listing: BUS 290 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: An introduction to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote art-based transactions. We explore the buying and selling of works of art, both within the auction framework and elsewhere. Lectures and interactions with sector specialists help students develop their ability to identify and analyze pieces of art, access marketing opportunities, and devise effective strategies for a variety of professional roles. We specifically investigate the role of the art dealer and art administrator, as well as gain a firm understanding of the international laws and other recognized practices that regulate the field.
The Cradle of Renaissance: Florence in Literature, Art and Architecture
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Junior Standing
Course code: ART 322 F
Dual Listing: LIT 322 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: The Italian Renaissance created much of the modern world as we know it today, and Florence from 1250 to 1550 was the cradle of the Renaissance. This course is an introduction to the art and literature of the Florentine Renaissance: we will read work by Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Castiglione and Michelangelo, see much of the great art in Florence focusing on lesser-visited museums and monuments, and read Vasari's lives of many of the key artists. The course will be conducted in English, and all readings will be in English. No prior background in either literature or art history is required or expected, just a willingness to explore the living laboratory of Florence and all of the cultural wonders created in it.
Images and Words
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Junior standing; 2) ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 355 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 477 L : Capping: Images and Words
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: What is art? Where do we see it and why do we look at it? How do we talk about, describe, or explain a work of art? Is it possible to “read” images the same way we can “see” stories, and if so, how? Our interdisciplinary approach aims to help students develop their ability to read, discuss, and write about both visual and written texts. This exploration of the relationship between us (spectators and/or creators), images and words opens up new ways of seeing and perceiving works of art. An introduction to the most relevant theoretical ideas is followed by a close examination of visual and written works, including prose and poetry. An active engagement with the entire universe of artistic experience through the teachings and methods of art theory and art history, literature, museology, and sociology.
Museum/Gallery Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Italian fluency is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students who lack Italian language skills. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline), onsite interview and Italian language placement test. Final placement may be determined upon Italian language ability. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: ART 360 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A hands-on, professional experience in cultural mediation and museum education. Interns observe how collections are managed at their host institution, conduct individual research, participate in giving guided tours and in organizing events and activities. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Museum and gallery internships require some Saturday hours. Held in either Florence or Rome. Note: Places are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Application requirements: CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test.
Museum/Gallery Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Italian fluency is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students who lack Italian language skills. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline), onsite interview and Italian language placement test. Final placement may be determined upon Italian language ability. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: ART 360 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A hands-on, professional experience in cultural mediation and museum education. Interns observe how collections are managed at their host institution, conduct individual research, participate in giving guided tours and in organizing events and activities. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Museum and gallery internships require some Saturday hours. Held in either Florence or Rome. Note: Places are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Application requirements: CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test.
Avant-Garde and Modernist Art (1900-1950)
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 370 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 366 L: History of 20th Century Art
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Modern art in Europe and America in the first half of the 20th century. Picasso, Matisse, Kirchner, Duchamp, Boccioni, De Chirico, Ernst, Magritte, Pollock. After reviewing the artistic and cultural revolutions of the previous half-century, we explore Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Dada, Metaphysical painting, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Dada, with a particular focus on the pre-World War II historical avant-gardes. What was so revolutionary about their ideas, methods, and artistic expressions? What were they reacting against or promoting, and what was the impact on art of the two world wars that traumatized the first half of the 20th century and beyond?
Contemporary Art
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 375 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 350 L Contemporary Art
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Pollock, Rothko, Dubuffet, Rauschenberg, Giacometti, Bacon, Warhol, Morris, Kosuth, Abramovic, Richter, Basquiat, Hirst, Banksy: a wide-ranging exploration of the most significant figures and stylistic trends in late 20th-century art. We investigate the interdisciplinary nature of the contemporary art world, firmly placing artistic production in its social, political and philosophical context, and examine how contemporary artistic languages and the art business interrelate. Topics include Abstract Expressionism, Informal art, Neo-Dada, Minimalism, Site-Specific Art, Conceptualism, Neo-Expressionism, and Graffiti and Street Art. Develops students’ aptitude for independent, critical thinking and research.
Contemporary Art
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 375 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 350 L Contemporary Art
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Pollock, Rothko, Dubuffet, Rauschenberg, Giacometti, Bacon, Warhol, Morris, Kosuth, Abramovic, Richter, Basquiat, Hirst, Banksy: a wide-ranging exploration of the most significant figures and stylistic trends in late 20th-century art. We investigate the interdisciplinary nature of the contemporary art world, firmly placing artistic production in its social, political and philosophical context, and examine how contemporary artistic languages and the art business interrelate. Topics include Abstract Expressionism, Informal art, Neo-Dada, Minimalism, Site-Specific Art, Conceptualism, Neo-Expressionism, and Graffiti and Street Art. Develops students’ aptitude for independent, critical thinking and research.
Principles of Microeconomics
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 178 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 103L Principles of Microeconomics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: How do individuals and businesses “behave” economically? How do the markets work? Economic analysis is an essential tool for understanding social phenomena, and we look at the basics of economic ways of thinking, with the help of economic theory and specific analytical methods and assumptions. We explore microeconomic languages, methods and modeling; the production process and market strategies for individual businesses; consumer theory and how economists model individual behavior; and how the competitive and non-competitive markets works. Case studies and the analysis of specific economic policies relevant to our more general topics provide useful context and show how theory works on the ground. Useful for students in the applied social sciences, and an essential foundation for further studies in Economics and Business.
Foundations of Management
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Foundations of Management
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: BUS 195 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195 N Foundations of Management
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Managers are the decision-makers. But based on what do they make those decisions? Designed to provide core concepts and terminology for those with no prior background in business management and an interest in further studies in the field. We explore what managers do, and how planning, organizing, directing and controlling can, if done properly, work synergistically toward the same goals. Key concepts are approached first in theoretical terms; then we look at how theory applies to the practical problems managers face on a day-to-day basis.
Corporate Social Responsibility
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 200N Corporate Social Responsibility
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Corporate social responsibility (or CSR) refers to companies’ need to ensure that business success goes hand in hand with policies that safeguard and promote the health and welfare of local communities and society at large. But who is “responsible” for corporate social responsibility? Individual workers, specific departments, or companies as a whole? How can corporations impact the world, both positively and negatively? CSR is intricately linked to the concept of sustainability, or our ability to reconcile human activity with the planet’s long-term well-being, and we focus on the benefits of making a company “sustainable.” Topics include the frameworks, contexts, and processes of ethical decision-making, environmental ethics, NGOs, auditing and social performance reporting, and stake-holder management.
Corporate Social Responsibility
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: BUS 200 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 200 N Corporate Social Responsibility
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Corporate social responsibility (or CSR) refers to companies’ need to ensure that business success goes hand in hand with policies that safeguard and promote the health and welfare of local communities and society at large. But who is “responsible” for corporate social responsibility? Individual workers, specific departments, or companies as a whole? How can corporations impact the world, both positively and negatively? CSR is intricately linked to the concept of sustainability, or our ability to reconcile human activity with the planet’s long-term well-being, and we focus on the benefits of making a company “sustainable.” Topics include the frameworks, contexts, and processes of ethical decision-making, environmental ethics, NGOs, auditing and social performance reporting, and stake-holder management.
Principles of Marketing
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Marketing
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: What makes marketing such a dynamic and exciting field? What can good marketing give to a company, and how can it help overcome the challenges businesses face on an everyday basis? We explore marketing’s essential principles and concepts, as well as the true nature and scope of marketing management. Topics include marketing strategy, the 4 P’s, market planning, retailing and wholesaling, target marketing, market segmentation, and services marketing. We also discuss marketing’s strategic importance to any organization, whether it be a for-profit commercial enterprise or a non-profit or charitable entity.
Principles of Finance
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332N Principles of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 F
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance. These include time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. Students will also be exposed to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 N Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents.
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 204
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 F
Dual Listing: IGC 252 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 T
Dual Listing: IGC 252 T
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Paolo Buzzurro
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Wine Business & Marketing
THU 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents; or concurrent enrollment in 'Two Italies' program
Course code: BUS 252 T
Dual Listing: IGC 252 T
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tymicha
Description: How is wine sold? Why are certain wines available worldwide, while others remain well-kept secrets? We explore the business and marketing of wine, with a special focus on Italian wines and on the U.S. market. Topics include sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. Includes business simulations and a student-created start-up or marketing project to develop the skills necessary for those interested in working in the wine and beverage industry.
Sustainability: Science, Political Economy and Business
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science or BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 259 F
Dual Listing: POL 259 F
Marist Code/Title: MGMT 259 N Sustain: Sci, Political Econ & Bus
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: The word “sustainability” seems to be everywhere these days. But how has this concept evolved over time? What are the fundamental ideas and theories that support it, and what are its scientific, technological, and economic dimensions? In examining these questions, we look closely at the roles of various stakeholders, such as governments, NGOs and businesses, in promoting a more sustainable society. There are also those who have opposed or impeded sustainable practices, and we explore how they have done so and their reasons, both stated and otherwise. Students develop their own sustainability-based project concerning a specific field of their choice.
Sustainability: Science, Political Economy and Business
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science or BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 259 F
Dual Listing: POL 259 F
Marist Code/Title: MGMT 259 N Sustain: Sci, Political Econ & Bus
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: The word “sustainability” seems to be everywhere these days. But how has this concept evolved over time? What are the fundamental ideas and theories that support it, and what are its scientific, technological, and economic dimensions? In examining these questions, we look closely at the roles of various stakeholders, such as governments, NGOs and businesses, in promoting a more sustainable society. There are also those who have opposed or impeded sustainable practices, and we explore how they have done so and their reasons, both stated and otherwise. Students develop their own sustainability-based project concerning a specific field of their choice.
Sustainability: Science, Political Economy and Business
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science or BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 259 F
Dual Listing: POL 259 F
Marist Code/Title: MGMT 259 N Sustain: Sci, Political Econ & Bus
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: The word “sustainability” seems to be everywhere these days. But how has this concept evolved over time? What are the fundamental ideas and theories that support it, and what are its scientific, technological, and economic dimensions? In examining these questions, we look closely at the roles of various stakeholders, such as governments, NGOs and businesses, in promoting a more sustainable society. There are also those who have opposed or impeded sustainable practices, and we explore how they have done so and their reasons, both stated and otherwise. Students develop their own sustainability-based project concerning a specific field of their choice.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: BUS 270 F
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Beyond Modern Capitalism: Rethinking the Global Socio-Economic Order
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalent. Recommended: BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 286 F
Dual Listing: POL 286 F
Marist Code/Title: MGMT 286 N Beyond Modern Capitalism
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: How has the current socio-economic order come to be? What are its origins, its most important developments, and what, if any, are the alternatives? With a critical, multidisciplinary approach, we examine the role of political, economic and social elements and forces in the evolution of the current capitalist system, fleshing out both its positive and negative aspects. We look at whether capitalism has a “sustainable” future, and investigate the feasibility of alternate models: would they be more capable of satisfying socio-economic needs in fair and equitable ways?
Beyond Modern Capitalism: Rethinking the Global Socio-Economic Order
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalent. Recommended: BUS 140 Introduction to Economics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 286 F
Dual Listing: POL 286 F
Marist Code/Title: MGMT 286 N Beyond Modern Capitalism
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: How has the current socio-economic order come to be? What are its origins, its most important developments, and what, if any, are the alternatives? With a critical, multidisciplinary approach, we examine the role of political, economic and social elements and forces in the evolution of the current capitalist system, fleshing out both its positive and negative aspects. We look at whether capitalism has a “sustainable” future, and investigate the feasibility of alternate models: would they be more capable of satisfying socio-economic needs in fair and equitable ways?
International Art Business
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 290 F
Dual Listing: ART 297 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: An introduction to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote art-based transactions. We explore the buying and selling of works of art, both within the auction framework and elsewhere. Lectures and interactions with sector specialists help students develop their ability to identify and analyze pieces of art, access marketing opportunities, and devise effective strategies for a variety of professional roles. We specifically investigate the role of the art dealer and art administrator, as well as gain a firm understanding of the international laws and other recognized practices that regulate the field.
Human Resources Management
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: What is the function of human resources (HR) management in a corporate setting? How can it be a key to success when done effectively? Our focus is on developing the knowledge and skills necessary for effective managers and leaders: the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, developing mission, vision, and strategy, and mastering key organizational features and processes. We explore a range of issues connected to managing people in a company: hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel recruitment and training. In their recently expanded roles, how do corporations deal with social problems and issues? Hones student skills in public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management.
Human Resources Management
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: What is the function of human resources (HR) management in a corporate setting? How can it be a key to success when done effectively? Our focus is on developing the knowledge and skills necessary for effective managers and leaders: the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, developing mission, vision, and strategy, and mastering key organizational features and processes. We explore a range of issues connected to managing people in a company: hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel recruitment and training. In their recently expanded roles, how do corporations deal with social problems and issues? Hones student skills in public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management.
Human Resources Management
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: What is the function of human resources (HR) management in a corporate setting? How can it be a key to success when done effectively? Our focus is on developing the knowledge and skills necessary for effective managers and leaders: the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, developing mission, vision, and strategy, and mastering key organizational features and processes. We explore a range of issues connected to managing people in a company: hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel recruitment and training. In their recently expanded roles, how do corporations deal with social problems and issues? Hones student skills in public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management.
Consumer Behavior
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 307 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 307 N Consumer Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What determines why people buy certain things, at certain times? How can they be “encouraged” in certain directions, and how can consumers avoid being manipulated by marketing and advertising? We explore consumer behavior across a number of domains: from the cognitive biases that impact our daily decisions to the ways in which consumers are influenced by the world around them. An interdisciplinary approach that draws on concepts and materials in Behavioral Economics, Psychology, and Marketing, offering a broad introduction as well as specific analysis of case studies to illustrate general ideas and principles.
Consumer Behavior
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 307 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 307 N Consumer Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: What determines why people buy certain things, at certain times? How can they be “encouraged” in certain directions, and how can consumers avoid being manipulated by marketing and advertising? We explore consumer behavior across a number of domains: from the cognitive biases that impact our daily decisions to the ways in which consumers are influenced by the world around them. An interdisciplinary approach that draws on concepts and materials in Behavioral Economics, Psychology, and Marketing, offering a broad introduction as well as specific analysis of case studies to illustrate general ideas and principles.
Consumer Behavior
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 307 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 307 N Consumer Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: What determines why people buy certain things, at certain times? How can they be “encouraged” in certain directions, and how can consumers avoid being manipulated by marketing and advertising? We explore consumer behavior across a number of domains: from the cognitive biases that impact our daily decisions to the ways in which consumers are influenced by the world around them. An interdisciplinary approach that draws on concepts and materials in Behavioral Economics, Psychology, and Marketing, offering a broad introduction as well as specific analysis of case studies to illustrate general ideas and principles.
Global Business and Society
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business and Society
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Global Business and Society
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Global Business and Society
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Global Business and Society
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: What challenges do modern corporations face in organizing international business operations? Our goal is to achieve a global perspective on long-term trends in world economic change, and understand how countries interact with one another. We explore the dynamics of international trade and investment, the relationship between trade and economic growth, and the risks of trade imbalances and protectionism. The role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and the characteristics of the most important emerging economies, India and China. Other topics include alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization, competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment.
Organizational Behavior
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 311 N Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
Organizational Behavior
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 311 N Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
Organizational Behavior
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 311 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 311 N Organizational Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: How do people and groups within organizations behave and react to and interpret events? What strategies can guide the parts to working effectively toward the goals of the whole? We explore the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping individual and collective behavior, and analyze why organizations function (or malfunction) the way they do. Our interdisciplinary approach draws on concepts and research from the fields of Management, Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology to provide a foundation for managing people successfully in any context.
International Marketing
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
International Marketing
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: In a globalized world of cutthroat competition, effective international marketing is critical to a company’s success. The benefits of operating in an international market include access to new sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, the relocation of manufacturing, and the distribution of products and services to new markets. Yet the risks, particularly in the short term, are significant, and benefits may not be immediate. We apply the principles of marketing to the complexities of foreign markets, emphasizing the various economic, social, and cultural factors that determine successful international marketing strategies, and how the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) can change in a global business environment.
Integrated Marketing Communication
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
International Business Negotiation
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 130 Introduction to Business or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 322 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 N ST: Conflict Transformation
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Corporate finance from the vantage point of the financial managers responsible for making crucial investment and financing decisions. How do you make effective marketing decisions? What are the keys to incisive operations management? Questions such as these depend in part on corporate finance, which must be well integrated into overall corporate strategy. We investigate such topics as leasing and leveraged buyouts, dividend policies, capital market efficiency, capital budgeting, and financial analysis and forecasting. Examples and case studies are used frequently to illustrate how concepts and theories play out in the real world.
International Business Negotiation
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 130 Introduction to Business or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 322 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 N ST: Conflict Transformation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: Corporate finance from the vantage point of the financial managers responsible for making crucial investment and financing decisions. How do you make effective marketing decisions? What are the keys to incisive operations management? Questions such as these depend in part on corporate finance, which must be well integrated into overall corporate strategy. We investigate such topics as leasing and leveraged buyouts, dividend policies, capital market efficiency, capital budgeting, and financial analysis and forecasting. Examples and case studies are used frequently to illustrate how concepts and theories play out in the real world.
International Business Negotiation
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 130 Introduction to Business or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 322 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 N ST: Conflict Transformation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Corporate finance from the vantage point of the financial managers responsible for making crucial investment and financing decisions. How do you make effective marketing decisions? What are the keys to incisive operations management? Questions such as these depend in part on corporate finance, which must be well integrated into overall corporate strategy. We investigate such topics as leasing and leveraged buyouts, dividend policies, capital market efficiency, capital budgeting, and financial analysis and forecasting. Examples and case studies are used frequently to illustrate how concepts and theories play out in the real world.
Luxury Brand Management
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 102
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 204
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 205
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 206
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Luxury Brand Management
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 207
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: Luxury brand management is both a concept and a global reality, representing a multi-billion-dollar market of goods and services. How has it developed over time? What are its political, economic and social aspects, and how does it relate to design, pop culture and the arts? Through a range of case studies and products in the fashion sector and beyond, we explore the challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a luxury brand, as well as its economic management and distribution. We also trace the evolution of luxury brand identities in terms of key concepts such as desire, status, exclusivity, supply and demand, consumption, and value, to understand how luxury brands resist global economic recession.
Marketing/Advertising Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing/Advertising majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, sample of marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 361 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 397 N Business Internship
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience at a communications agency in Florence, or a local business in Tuscania. Interns participate in activities including market research, developing marketing, price, distribution and promotional strategies, creating ads for local and international print and e-publications, issuing newsletters and mailing lists, creating website content, and managing social media. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades, assigned by the faculty supervisor, reflect weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent, a sample of marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects). Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during first week of term.
Marketing / Event Planning Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / PR / Event Planning majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: Min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Public transport costs may apply.
Course code: BUS 367 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 397 N Business Internship
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience at an event management company. Interns participate in activities including managing actual events, assisting vendors with site visits and clients, social media marketing campaigns, designing marketing materials, analyzing brand image, market appeal and customer projections, and clerical and administrative work as required. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades, assigned by the faculty supervisor, reflect weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: CV, two letters of reference, a formal letter of intent, and a writing sample. Supporting documentation must be submitted by application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during first week of term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 369 F
Dual Listing: COM 370 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 369 F
Dual Listing: COM 370 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Global Financial Markets
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 363 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Global Financial Markets
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 363 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Global Financial Markets
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 363 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Global Financial Markets
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 380 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 363 N Global Financial Markets
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Globalization and integration of international financial markets present unique opportunities and unique risks for investors, bankers, firms and policymakers. For students seeking advancements or employment in the banking industry or wishing to understand financing opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, this course is focused on the competitive dynamics and performance of the global financial markets. It addresses organizational strategy, capital market products, risk diversification and market developments, including the US, Europe and the emerging markets. Topics also include the structure and types of capital markets, and how to identify key participants and their impact on the market Throughout the course, current events are used to illustrate and reinforce class material.
Operations Management
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Effective operations management is crucial in the industrial, service, and other sectors. We investigate good practices and incisive methodologies useful in these and other professional contexts: quantitative decision-making techniques, forecasting, planning techniques for managing capacities, locations, and processes, resource and materials planning, and the design of job and work measurement systems. Other key topics include inventory systems, models and quality-control methods.
Operations Management
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Effective operations management is crucial in the industrial, service, and other sectors. We investigate good practices and incisive methodologies useful in these and other professional contexts: quantitative decision-making techniques, forecasting, planning techniques for managing capacities, locations, and processes, resource and materials planning, and the design of job and work measurement systems. Other key topics include inventory systems, models and quality-control methods.
Operations Management
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Effective operations management is crucial in the industrial, service, and other sectors. We investigate good practices and incisive methodologies useful in these and other professional contexts: quantitative decision-making techniques, forecasting, planning techniques for managing capacities, locations, and processes, resource and materials planning, and the design of job and work measurement systems. Other key topics include inventory systems, models and quality-control methods.
Operations Management
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Effective operations management is crucial in the industrial, service, and other sectors. We investigate good practices and incisive methodologies useful in these and other professional contexts: quantitative decision-making techniques, forecasting, planning techniques for managing capacities, locations, and processes, resource and materials planning, and the design of job and work measurement systems. Other key topics include inventory systems, models and quality-control methods.
Presentation and Public Speaking
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Speaking and presenting comfortably and effectively in public is a life skill. In both personal and professional situations, these abilities can make the difference between success and failure. In individual, group and class exercises, we explore and consolidate the skills and methods for overcoming performance anxiety, controlling voice and body language, and saying what you want to say in the way you want to say it. What makes for a good delivery? How do you get the most out of your research, outline and multimedia materials? We also analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral form, to see how skilled communicators craft effective communications.
Presentation and Public Speaking
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Speaking and presenting comfortably and effectively in public is a life skill. In both personal and professional situations, these abilities can make the difference between success and failure. In individual, group and class exercises, we explore and consolidate the skills and methods for overcoming performance anxiety, controlling voice and body language, and saying what you want to say in the way you want to say it. What makes for a good delivery? How do you get the most out of your research, outline and multimedia materials? We also analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral form, to see how skilled communicators craft effective communications.
Presentation and Public Speaking
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: COM 105 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Speaking and presenting comfortably and effectively in public is a life skill. In both personal and professional situations, these abilities can make the difference between success and failure. In individual, group and class exercises, we explore and consolidate the skills and methods for overcoming performance anxiety, controlling voice and body language, and saying what you want to say in the way you want to say it. What makes for a good delivery? How do you get the most out of your research, outline and multimedia materials? We also analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral form, to see how skilled communicators craft effective communications.
Introduction to Communications
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 130 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: The essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, types, and effects of communication. We get to know the basics communicative categories (interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, cultural) and explore how specific contexts affect its forms. What ethical issues are at stake in the world of communications, and what global opportunities and challenges does it offer? How are new technologies affecting the way we think about communications, and the types of professional opportunities available? Develops critical thinking and writing skills, as well as confidence and effectiveness in group work and presentations.
Introduction to Communications
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 130 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: The essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, types, and effects of communication. We get to know the basics communicative categories (interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, cultural) and explore how specific contexts affect its forms. What ethical issues are at stake in the world of communications, and what global opportunities and challenges does it offer? How are new technologies affecting the way we think about communications, and the types of professional opportunities available? Develops critical thinking and writing skills, as well as confidence and effectiveness in group work and presentations.
Introduction to Communications
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: COM 130 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: The essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, types, and effects of communication. We get to know the basics communicative categories (interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, cultural) and explore how specific contexts affect its forms. What ethical issues are at stake in the world of communications, and what global opportunities and challenges does it offer? How are new technologies affecting the way we think about communications, and the types of professional opportunities available? Develops critical thinking and writing skills, as well as confidence and effectiveness in group work and presentations.
New Media: Communication in the Digital Age
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 182 F
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 311 L Communication Revolution
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: “Mass media” have existed for centuries, but what does the term signify today? In decades past, they consisted of physical, paper newspapers, radio, and television; but the digital age has introduced new devices for receiving and sharing information (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual locations (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms) that are supposedly shaped around our desires and interests, but which we often come to perceive as imposed “needs.” We explore the causes and effects of the digital revolution, the features and functions of the principal digital communications devices (and sites), and how they have impacted us as citizens, artists, professionals, and individuals.
Advertising Principles
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalents
Course code: COM 204 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 220 L Intro to Strategic Advertising
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Advertising is far more than just organizing images into a commercial. Every ad on the Internet, TV, or in print is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular, “target” audience, aiming to create a positive perception of the product in the consumer’s mind. We explore the theory and practice of contemporary advertising: the media and graphic strategies used to deliver it, the philosophy behind it, its impact on the economy and consumer behavior, and current advertising trends from a creative and marketing standpoint. What makes for successful advertising? We also gauge the impact of stereotypes in advertising, and society’s reaction to them.
Advertising Principles
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalents
Course code: COM 204 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 220 L Intro to Strategic Advertising
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Advertising is far more than just organizing images into a commercial. Every ad on the Internet, TV, or in print is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular, “target” audience, aiming to create a positive perception of the product in the consumer’s mind. We explore the theory and practice of contemporary advertising: the media and graphic strategies used to deliver it, the philosophy behind it, its impact on the economy and consumer behavior, and current advertising trends from a creative and marketing standpoint. What makes for successful advertising? We also gauge the impact of stereotypes in advertising, and society’s reaction to them.
The Body Speaks: The Importance of Non-Verbal Communication
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 212 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Body language matters. Understanding and managing it is key to good interpersonal relations and effective communication, in the working world as well as in our personal lives. We develop an awareness and know-how of both verbal and non-verbal communication, and how they work together. In both individual and group contexts, students learn the importance of motivation, the coherence between body and spoken language, and effective use of tone of voice and eye contact. Students “learn by doing,” engaging in practical, proactive scripted and improvisational exercises (theatrical techniques, team building, self-presentation, and movement drills) to assess their own strengths and weaknesses, and then implement a personal program to chart and consolidate their progress.
The Body Speaks: The Importance of Non-Verbal Communication
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 212 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Body language matters. Understanding and managing it is key to good interpersonal relations and effective communication, in the working world as well as in our personal lives. We develop an awareness and know-how of both verbal and non-verbal communication, and how they work together. In both individual and group contexts, students learn the importance of motivation, the coherence between body and spoken language, and effective use of tone of voice and eye contact. Students “learn by doing,” engaging in practical, proactive scripted and improvisational exercises (theatrical techniques, team building, self-presentation, and movement drills) to assess their own strengths and weaknesses, and then implement a personal program to chart and consolidate their progress.
Communications Research Methods
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communication, or equivalent
Course code: COM 225 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 200 L Communication Res Methods
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Knowing how to conduct research is just as important as knowing what to research. We explore a range of methods for carrying out communications research in both academic and professional settings. Finding information, evaluating it, and drawing conclusions that have value for communications issues in the real world. Students learn the fundamentals of research design and strategy, source identification and data gathering, and types of qualitative and quantitative analysis.
Media Ethics
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: In today’s media, is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there rules for ethical behavior that govern journalists, and if so, who makes them? What are the ethical implications of information? In a complex communications landscape, our image of society is shaped by crucial issues and problems that are presented and often forgotten at breakneck speed; journalists, editors, and professionals in advertising and public relations must weigh the pros and cons of covering stories that put people in danger or arouse conflicts of interest and loyalties. We explore how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, the consequences of war and peacetime on information, the complicated management of public relations, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence and the new frontiers of mass communications.
Media Ethics
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: In today’s media, is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there rules for ethical behavior that govern journalists, and if so, who makes them? What are the ethical implications of information? In a complex communications landscape, our image of society is shaped by crucial issues and problems that are presented and often forgotten at breakneck speed; journalists, editors, and professionals in advertising and public relations must weigh the pros and cons of covering stories that put people in danger or arouse conflicts of interest and loyalties. We explore how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, the consequences of war and peacetime on information, the complicated management of public relations, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence and the new frontiers of mass communications.
Media Ethics
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: In today’s media, is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there rules for ethical behavior that govern journalists, and if so, who makes them? What are the ethical implications of information? In a complex communications landscape, our image of society is shaped by crucial issues and problems that are presented and often forgotten at breakneck speed; journalists, editors, and professionals in advertising and public relations must weigh the pros and cons of covering stories that put people in danger or arouse conflicts of interest and loyalties. We explore how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, the consequences of war and peacetime on information, the complicated management of public relations, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence and the new frontiers of mass communications.
Media Ethics
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: COM 245 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: In today’s media, is there anything that cannot be said or done? Are there rules for ethical behavior that govern journalists, and if so, who makes them? What are the ethical implications of information? In a complex communications landscape, our image of society is shaped by crucial issues and problems that are presented and often forgotten at breakneck speed; journalists, editors, and professionals in advertising and public relations must weigh the pros and cons of covering stories that put people in danger or arouse conflicts of interest and loyalties. We explore how communications professionals decide what to say and what to censure, the consequences of war and peacetime on information, the complicated management of public relations, and the ethical challenges of digital convergence and the new frontiers of mass communications.
Food Marketing & Communication
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent; sophomore standing. A prior course in Communications is recommended.
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: COM 253 F
Dual Listing: IGC 253 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 318 L Spec Topics: Comm
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: An introduction to the fundamental operational and strategic dynamics that shape marketing and communications in the agri-food industry. We compare and contrast different gastronomic cultures and traditions, comparing and contrasting the food marketing strategies related to them. Students examine and analyze case studies and success stories, ranging from small-scale producers to multinational companies, investigating the importance of geographical and social context in communicating food from a variety of perspectives. They then implement the tools and methodologies we’ve covered, keeping in mind both client and consumer, to design and develop an integrated marketing and communication plan for an agri-food business.
Food Marketing & Communication
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent; sophomore standing. A prior course in Communications is recommended.
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: COM 253 F
Dual Listing: IGC 253 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: An introduction to the fundamental operational and strategic dynamics that shape marketing and communications in the agri-food industry. We compare and contrast different gastronomic cultures and traditions, comparing and contrasting the food marketing strategies related to them. Students examine and analyze case studies and success stories, ranging from small-scale producers to multinational companies, investigating the importance of geographical and social context in communicating food from a variety of perspectives. They then implement the tools and methodologies we’ve covered, keeping in mind both client and consumer, to design and develop an integrated marketing and communication plan for an agri-food business.
Food Marketing & Communication
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent; sophomore standing. A prior course in Communications is recommended.
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: COM 253 F
Dual Listing: IGC 253 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: An introduction to the fundamental operational and strategic dynamics that shape marketing and communications in the agri-food industry. We compare and contrast different gastronomic cultures and traditions, comparing and contrasting the food marketing strategies related to them. Students examine and analyze case studies and success stories, ranging from small-scale producers to multinational companies, investigating the importance of geographical and social context in communicating food from a variety of perspectives. They then implement the tools and methodologies we’ve covered, keeping in mind both client and consumer, to design and develop an integrated marketing and communication plan for an agri-food business.
Literature and Journalism
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 260 F
Dual Listing: LIT 260 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 342 L: Readings in Journalism
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Inventing stories and reporting the facts: literature and journalism would seem to have little in common. But is that actually the case? In truth many writers pass back and forth between the two categories, or blend them into new and original expressive styles. We examine literature and journalism in a comparative context, with a focus on American and Italian writers, from Poe to Buzzati to exponents of the American New Journalism movement (T. Wolfe, N. Mailer, G. Talese, etc.) and postmodernism (in the figures of Fallaci and Tabucchi, among others). Topics include the reporter as a character, style in fiction and non-fiction, theories of information, the news and chronicle, and the concept of art as a means of information.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: COM 271 F
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: The workplace is becoming increasingly multicultural, whether the context is side by side in an office, or a collaboration on international projects. What are the difficulties and solutions in getting outside the comfort zone of our own cultural expectations and being sensitive to those of others? Our goal is to understand intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both a theoretical and practical standpoint. We explore business practices in different countries, with a focus on Italy and the U.S., and discuss them in the context of case studies. Student will also actively participate in role-play and observational exercises designed to help anticipate and manage intercultural misunderstandings at work, as well as in more informal settings.
Public Relations
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What are we referring to when we speak of “public relations”? What does someone in PR do, and how have jobs in this sector changed over the decades? We explore PR theory, as well as the tools and strategies for a successful public relations campaign (planning, issue analysis, research methods and goals). Through case studies and exercises, we familiarize ourselves with the fields in which PR professionals operate: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. The future of the field, and how new technologies may contribute to more effective, original PR solutions
Public Relations
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What are we referring to when we speak of “public relations”? What does someone in PR do, and how have jobs in this sector changed over the decades? We explore PR theory, as well as the tools and strategies for a successful public relations campaign (planning, issue analysis, research methods and goals). Through case studies and exercises, we familiarize ourselves with the fields in which PR professionals operate: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. The future of the field, and how new technologies may contribute to more effective, original PR solutions
Public Relations
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: What are we referring to when we speak of “public relations”? What does someone in PR do, and how have jobs in this sector changed over the decades? We explore PR theory, as well as the tools and strategies for a successful public relations campaign (planning, issue analysis, research methods and goals). Through case studies and exercises, we familiarize ourselves with the fields in which PR professionals operate: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. The future of the field, and how new technologies may contribute to more effective, original PR solutions
War and the Media
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: Does the media influence military decision-making? How do government officials use information channels to influence public opinion and justify their actions? Can the news be “managed”? We explore the media’s role in military conflict and media-related strategies in the context of key later-20th-century international conflicts. The proliferation of satellite technologies, international TV networks such as CNN and Al Jazeera, and Internet; still vs. moving images; journalists and journalistic conventions; press conferences, briefings, and official statements; war in movies and art; the media gap between "North" and "South" and the emergence of "non-Western" media; and the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and the Media
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: Does the media influence military decision-making? How do government officials use information channels to influence public opinion and justify their actions? Can the news be “managed”? We explore the media’s role in military conflict and media-related strategies in the context of key later-20th-century international conflicts. The proliferation of satellite technologies, international TV networks such as CNN and Al Jazeera, and Internet; still vs. moving images; journalists and journalistic conventions; press conferences, briefings, and official statements; war in movies and art; the media gap between "North" and "South" and the emergence of "non-Western" media; and the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and the Media
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: Does the media influence military decision-making? How do government officials use information channels to influence public opinion and justify their actions? Can the news be “managed”? We explore the media’s role in military conflict and media-related strategies in the context of key later-20th-century international conflicts. The proliferation of satellite technologies, international TV networks such as CNN and Al Jazeera, and Internet; still vs. moving images; journalists and journalistic conventions; press conferences, briefings, and official statements; war in movies and art; the media gap between "North" and "South" and the emergence of "non-Western" media; and the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and the Media
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Does the media influence military decision-making? How do government officials use information channels to influence public opinion and justify their actions? Can the news be “managed”? We explore the media’s role in military conflict and media-related strategies in the context of key later-20th-century international conflicts. The proliferation of satellite technologies, international TV networks such as CNN and Al Jazeera, and Internet; still vs. moving images; journalists and journalistic conventions; press conferences, briefings, and official statements; war in movies and art; the media gap between "North" and "South" and the emergence of "non-Western" media; and the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
Communication and Leadership
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications or equivalent
Course code: COM 304 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 305 N: Communications & Leadership
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Particularly in times of crisis, we crave effective leadership. How does a person’s ability to communicate effectively contribute to how they are viewed by others, and to their acceptance as a leader of communities, businesses, and institutions? We explore the tasks, strategies, and skills of an effective leader, moving from theories and concepts to the practical actions that, when combined with good communication skills and charisma, transform someone into a figure that others trust and follow. Key topics include motivation, credibility, influence, power, communicative style, negotiation, ethics, diversity, and current models of leadership.
Communication and Leadership
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications or equivalent
Course code: COM 304 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 305 N: Communications & Leadership
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: Particularly in times of crisis, we crave effective leadership. How does a person’s ability to communicate effectively contribute to how they are viewed by others, and to their acceptance as a leader of communities, businesses, and institutions? We explore the tasks, strategies, and skills of an effective leader, moving from theories and concepts to the practical actions that, when combined with good communication skills and charisma, transform someone into a figure that others trust and follow. Key topics include motivation, credibility, influence, power, communicative style, negotiation, ethics, diversity, and current models of leadership.
Communication and Leadership
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications or equivalent
Course code: COM 304 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 305 N: Communications & Leadership
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Particularly in times of crisis, we crave effective leadership. How does a person’s ability to communicate effectively contribute to how they are viewed by others, and to their acceptance as a leader of communities, businesses, and institutions? We explore the tasks, strategies, and skills of an effective leader, moving from theories and concepts to the practical actions that, when combined with good communication skills and charisma, transform someone into a figure that others trust and follow. Key topics include motivation, credibility, influence, power, communicative style, negotiation, ethics, diversity, and current models of leadership.
Intercultural Communication
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee of effective communication. What are the major obstacles to conveying effective messages across cultural lines, and what strategies and methods can overcome these obstacles? We explore the fundamental patterns in cross-cultural psychology and communication, analyzing how people manage to (or not to) understand each other in individual, group, and intercultural scenarios. Topics include the influence of culture on personal identity, common communication difficulties, communicative roles, differing conceptions of personal space (proxemics), rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Intercultural Communication
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee of effective communication. What are the major obstacles to conveying effective messages across cultural lines, and what strategies and methods can overcome these obstacles? We explore the fundamental patterns in cross-cultural psychology and communication, analyzing how people manage to (or not to) understand each other in individual, group, and intercultural scenarios. Topics include the influence of culture on personal identity, common communication difficulties, communicative roles, differing conceptions of personal space (proxemics), rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee of effective communication. What are the major obstacles to conveying effective messages across cultural lines, and what strategies and methods can overcome these obstacles? We explore the fundamental patterns in cross-cultural psychology and communication, analyzing how people manage to (or not to) understand each other in individual, group, and intercultural scenarios. Topics include the influence of culture on personal identity, common communication difficulties, communicative roles, differing conceptions of personal space (proxemics), rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 42
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee of effective communication. What are the major obstacles to conveying effective messages across cultural lines, and what strategies and methods can overcome these obstacles? We explore the fundamental patterns in cross-cultural psychology and communication, analyzing how people manage to (or not to) understand each other in individual, group, and intercultural scenarios. Topics include the influence of culture on personal identity, common communication difficulties, communicative roles, differing conceptions of personal space (proxemics), rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee of effective communication. What are the major obstacles to conveying effective messages across cultural lines, and what strategies and methods can overcome these obstacles? We explore the fundamental patterns in cross-cultural psychology and communication, analyzing how people manage to (or not to) understand each other in individual, group, and intercultural scenarios. Topics include the influence of culture on personal identity, common communication difficulties, communicative roles, differing conceptions of personal space (proxemics), rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Even a common language is no guarantee of effective communication. What are the major obstacles to conveying effective messages across cultural lines, and what strategies and methods can overcome these obstacles? We explore the fundamental patterns in cross-cultural psychology and communication, analyzing how people manage to (or not to) understand each other in individual, group, and intercultural scenarios. Topics include the influence of culture on personal identity, common communication difficulties, communicative roles, differing conceptions of personal space (proxemics), rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and the mass media’s influence on cross-cultural representations of reality.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: New technologies have expanded the possibilities of human communication and interaction on a global scale. How can marketers take advantage of these new channels to capture customers’ attention more effectively? The importance of this question explains why marketing communication is one of the most exciting, fastest-growing fields in modern marketing. We explore the most relevant theoretical concepts and the practical techniques most applicable to today’s major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. Student projects will assess a selected company’s marketing approach and develop an effective strategy proposal.
Global Sports Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: In an increasingly globalized economy, sports, teams, and individual players are marketed and sold around the world. How did the global sports economy arise? How are international sports brands created? We explore the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships and event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex framework of international sports and their global audiences. How does sports marketing deal with differences in marketing practices and cultures around the world? How does a global audience impact corporate sponsorships, and how do different communities react to local and global sporting events? Includes case studies of various global sporting events, which students use as a template to create their own strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Global Sports Marketing
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: In an increasingly globalized economy, sports, teams, and individual players are marketed and sold around the world. How did the global sports economy arise? How are international sports brands created? We explore the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships and event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex framework of international sports and their global audiences. How does sports marketing deal with differences in marketing practices and cultures around the world? How does a global audience impact corporate sponsorships, and how do different communities react to local and global sporting events? Includes case studies of various global sporting events, which students use as a template to create their own strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Global Sports Marketing
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 352 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: In an increasingly globalized economy, sports, teams, and individual players are marketed and sold around the world. How did the global sports economy arise? How are international sports brands created? We explore the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships and event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex framework of international sports and their global audiences. How does sports marketing deal with differences in marketing practices and cultures around the world? How does a global audience impact corporate sponsorships, and how do different communities react to local and global sporting events? Includes case studies of various global sporting events, which students use as a template to create their own strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Communications Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) English/Writing/Journalism majors of junior standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Excellent written English. Recommended: Strong communication skills, and fluency in Italian
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, writing sample (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 362 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 363 N International Communication Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A hands-on, professional experience at a communications agency. Interns perform tasks that may include writing new articles and updating and/or adapting preexisting articles in various media formats, database entry, contributing to blogs, social media, and websites, and developing new projects. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 370 F
Dual Listing: BUS 369 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian is recommended, but not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 370 F
Dual Listing: BUS 369 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 308 / MDIA 361 N International Communication Internship / Media Internship
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 135
Premises: off campus
Room: External
Description: A practical, professional experience in LdM’s Social Media Office or at an advertising or communication agency. Interns perform tasks that may include social media-based market research, promotional and advertising strategy development, photo archive management and development, managing and interacting with the LdM alumni network and its communication tools, and managing online databases. Monitoring is carried out by an onsite supervisor and a faculty member. Grades reflect the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. 10-12 hours weekly at the internship site; schedules and onsite duties may vary. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission requirements: student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (blog writing, social media campaigns, press releases, advertising projects, photos). Supporting documentation must be submitted by the application deadline, and acceptance is subject to an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Global Brand Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Global Brand Management
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Global Brand Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Global Brand Management
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 307 Consumer Behavior, or Knowledge of essential concepts of Marketing
Course code: COM 411 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Tiziano
Description: What makes brands successful across cultures and borders, able to survive economic crises and prosper on a global level? We take an in-depth look at the ingredients for worldwide profitability and visibility, developing and applying research-based strategic planning to the management of new or existing global brands: analyses of consumer behavior, the impact of current consumer and global economic trends on new and existing brands, and image management and marketing in a multicultural context. The course project requires students to design and develop an integrated communications campaign to launch a brand, acquire customers, and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Consumer Insights and Strategic Development
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
Course code: COM 421 F
Marist Code/Title: COM 428 L Consu Ins/Devl
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Verdi
Description: Get into the mind of the consumer. What makes people choose between different alternatives (brands, products, retailers)? How are they influenced by their cultural and socio-economic background, family, peers, or the media? We explore the behavior that consumers, groups or organizations display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services they expect to satisfy their needs, and how to use this information to best develop marketing strategies. A theoretical and practical approach within a global framework, aiming to understand what drives consumer behavior and how individuals and businesses can use this knowledge most effectively.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ENV 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Perhaps never before has the environment been such a central theme in our lives. Yet it is also a potentially limitless field in which it is easy to get lost or sidetracked. We explore the major concepts and questions to provide a foundation for understanding the critical environmental issues of today and tomorrow: climate change, population growth, natural resource management, pollution, global changes in biodiversity and wildlife, habitat loss, land and coastal erosion, food production, water resources, and changing consumption and living habits. A reflection on global environmental issues within an earth systems framework that places the various pieces of the puzzle in dialogue with one another.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: ENV 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: Perhaps never before has the environment been such a central theme in our lives. Yet it is also a potentially limitless field in which it is easy to get lost or sidetracked. We explore the major concepts and questions to provide a foundation for understanding the critical environmental issues of today and tomorrow: climate change, population growth, natural resource management, pollution, global changes in biodiversity and wildlife, habitat loss, land and coastal erosion, food production, water resources, and changing consumption and living habits. A reflection on global environmental issues within an earth systems framework that places the various pieces of the puzzle in dialogue with one another.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ENV 180 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: Perhaps never before has the environment been such a central theme in our lives. Yet it is also a potentially limitless field in which it is easy to get lost or sidetracked. We explore the major concepts and questions to provide a foundation for understanding the critical environmental issues of today and tomorrow: climate change, population growth, natural resource management, pollution, global changes in biodiversity and wildlife, habitat loss, land and coastal erosion, food production, water resources, and changing consumption and living habits. A reflection on global environmental issues within an earth systems framework that places the various pieces of the puzzle in dialogue with one another.
Sustainable Forest Management
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ENV 190 T
Dual Listing: AGR 190 T
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 290 L Sustainable Forest Management
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tina
Description: Our forests are unique: a symbol of life, and essential to our lives. They provide food, water, renewable energy, shelter, recreation, and inspiration; they are home to countless species of plants and animals, help mitigate climate change, and protect the soil. Our focus will be on temperate forests in particular, such as those in Europe and North America, conditioned by centuries of human settlement and activities. What are their principal characteristics, and how can they be successfully managed and protected to ensure their survival long into the future? Topics include tree biology, forest ecology, tree identification methodologies, and forest harvesting and protection. Field trips and hands-on activities offer students direct experience with how a forest functions, and the strategies for ensuring that it continues to prosper.
Sustainable Forest Management
TUE 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ENV 190 T
Dual Listing: AGR 190 T
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 290 L Sustainable Forest Management
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tymicha
Description: Our forests are unique: a symbol of life, and essential to our lives. They provide food, water, renewable energy, shelter, recreation, and inspiration; they are home to countless species of plants and animals, help mitigate climate change, and protect the soil. Our focus will be on temperate forests in particular, such as those in Europe and North America, conditioned by centuries of human settlement and activities. What are their principal characteristics, and how can they be successfully managed and protected to ensure their survival long into the future? Topics include tree biology, forest ecology, tree identification methodologies, and forest harvesting and protection. Field trips and hands-on activities offer students direct experience with how a forest functions, and the strategies for ensuring that it continues to prosper.
Sustainable Italy: Environmental Awareness and Ecotourism
MON to THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ENV 238 T
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Intro to Environmental Issues
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Beatrice
Description: Sustainable practices represent an incredible opportunity for “ecotourism,” which aims to attract visitors and provide them with accommodations and activities that don’t exploit or damage the environment. We look at how problems of natural resources management can be transformed into exciting new possibilities, and the importance of raising awareness of this potential for economic gain via environmental preservation and revival. Focusing particularly on Italy and Tuscany, we explore the range of ecosystem services (support, provisioning, regulating, cultural activities) that can stimulate local economies while protecting our natural heritage. A multidisciplinary perspective combines classroom learning, research, and fieldwork to expose students to the fascinating complexity of the environment and the possibilities for a more sustainable future.
Sustainable Food and the New Global Challenge
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: ENV 280 F
Dual Listing: IGC 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L: Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Food and culinary culture through the lens of environmental preservation, sustainable agriculture, biological and culinary diversity, and global social justice. Our multidisciplinary approach combines cutting-edge academic research with the traditional, grassroots knowledge of farmers and producers, exploring the nutritional, social, and environmental aspects of food and food systems. What are the big-picture consequences of developing sustainable food sources? Are there any negative effects from an economic perspective? What is the place of individual consumers in today’s global food system, and how can they exercise power and make their choices count?
Sustainable Food and the New Global Challenge
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: ENV 280 F
Dual Listing: IGC 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L: Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Food and culinary culture through the lens of environmental preservation, sustainable agriculture, biological and culinary diversity, and global social justice. Our multidisciplinary approach combines cutting-edge academic research with the traditional, grassroots knowledge of farmers and producers, exploring the nutritional, social, and environmental aspects of food and food systems. What are the big-picture consequences of developing sustainable food sources? Are there any negative effects from an economic perspective? What is the place of individual consumers in today’s global food system, and how can they exercise power and make their choices count?
Sustainable Food and the New Global Challenge
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: Lecture course only
Course code: ENV 280 F
Dual Listing: IGC 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L: Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Food and culinary culture through the lens of environmental preservation, sustainable agriculture, biological and culinary diversity, and global social justice. Our multidisciplinary approach combines cutting-edge academic research with the traditional, grassroots knowledge of farmers and producers, exploring the nutritional, social, and environmental aspects of food and food systems. What are the big-picture consequences of developing sustainable food sources? Are there any negative effects from an economic perspective? What is the place of individual consumers in today’s global food system, and how can they exercise power and make their choices count?
Sustainable Food and the New Global Challenge
WED 11:00 AM-1:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: Lecture only, no hands-on component
Course code: ENV 280 T
Dual Listing: IGC 280 T
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Site: Tuscania
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Tymicha
Description: Food and culinary culture through the lens of environmental preservation, sustainable agriculture, biological and culinary diversity, and global social justice. Our multidisciplinary approach combines cutting-edge academic research with the traditional, grassroots knowledge of farmers and producers, exploring the nutritional, social, and environmental aspects of food and food systems. What are the big-picture consequences of developing sustainable food sources? Are there any negative effects from an economic perspective? What is the place of individual consumers in today’s global food system, and how can they exercise power and make their choices count?
Geography, Environment, and Society
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher
Notes: in collaboration with University of Hawaii at Manoa
Course code: ENV 325 F
Dual Listing: SOC 325 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Environmental Studies and Geography
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Examines the geography of resources and environmental change with a holistic and multi-scale perspective. Social approaches to resolving environmental problems.
Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: GND 280 F
Dual Listing: PSY 280 F
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 232 L Sex, Evolution & Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Darwin’s On the Origin of Species triggered a profound intellectual revolution in both the natural and social sciences. The scientist’s theory of natural selection had a deep impact on countless issues related to our understanding of religion, gender, race, and human behavior. But how well do we really know Darwin’s work and the conclusions that have been drawn from it? We examine the essential principles of Darwin's theory, then dive into the theoretical bases of modern evolutionary biology and some of the most popular (and controversial) theories of evolutionary psychology, concerning human reproduction, gender, love relationships, and beauty. How have post-Darwinian evolutionary ideas – and eugenics in particular – developed, and what do they tell us about the flaws in popular scientific thinking and the potential limits of the scientific method and its culture?
Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: GND 280 F
Dual Listing: PSY 280 F
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 232 L Sex, Evolution & Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Darwin’s On the Origin of Species triggered a profound intellectual revolution in both the natural and social sciences. The scientist’s theory of natural selection had a deep impact on countless issues related to our understanding of religion, gender, race, and human behavior. But how well do we really know Darwin’s work and the conclusions that have been drawn from it? We examine the essential principles of Darwin's theory, then dive into the theoretical bases of modern evolutionary biology and some of the most popular (and controversial) theories of evolutionary psychology, concerning human reproduction, gender, love relationships, and beauty. How have post-Darwinian evolutionary ideas – and eugenics in particular – developed, and what do they tell us about the flaws in popular scientific thinking and the potential limits of the scientific method and its culture?
Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: GND 280 F
Dual Listing: PSY 280 F
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 232 L Sex, Evolution & Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Darwin’s On the Origin of Species triggered a profound intellectual revolution in both the natural and social sciences. The scientist’s theory of natural selection had a deep impact on countless issues related to our understanding of religion, gender, race, and human behavior. But how well do we really know Darwin’s work and the conclusions that have been drawn from it? We examine the essential principles of Darwin's theory, then dive into the theoretical bases of modern evolutionary biology and some of the most popular (and controversial) theories of evolutionary psychology, concerning human reproduction, gender, love relationships, and beauty. How have post-Darwinian evolutionary ideas – and eugenics in particular – developed, and what do they tell us about the flaws in popular scientific thinking and the potential limits of the scientific method and its culture?
Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: GND 280 F
Dual Listing: PSY 280 F
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 232 L Sex, Evolution & Behavior
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: Darwin’s On the Origin of Species triggered a profound intellectual revolution in both the natural and social sciences. The scientist’s theory of natural selection had a deep impact on countless issues related to our understanding of religion, gender, race, and human behavior. But how well do we really know Darwin’s work and the conclusions that have been drawn from it? We examine the essential principles of Darwin's theory, then dive into the theoretical bases of modern evolutionary biology and some of the most popular (and controversial) theories of evolutionary psychology, concerning human reproduction, gender, love relationships, and beauty. How have post-Darwinian evolutionary ideas – and eugenics in particular – developed, and what do they tell us about the flaws in popular scientific thinking and the potential limits of the scientific method and its culture?
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: GND 281 F
Dual Listing: ART 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: GND 281 F
Dual Listing: ART 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Women Artists: From the Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: GND 281 F
Dual Listing: ART 281 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 382 L ST: Women Artists
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Despite women’s active role in the art world for centuries, we tend to identify them more as patrons, muses and models than as artists. Bucking this trend, we explore the extraordinary contribution of female artists to Western art history, and how they have shaped the evolution of artistic language from the Renaissance to today. A critical analysis and contextualization of artists such as Plautilla Nelli, Artemisia Gentileschi, Sofonisba Anguissola, Rosalba Carriera, Berthe Morisot, Tamara de Lempicka, Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman, and Marina Abramovic, whose works will be analyzed in their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as in a larger art-historical perspective, allows students to appreciate how female artists have gained increasing prominence in the art world in recent centuries, and grapple with the question of whether art by women possesses exclusive qualities absent from work by their male counterparts.
Women in Religion
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: GND 286 F
Dual Listing: REL 286 F
Marist Code/Title: REST 316 L Women in Religion
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: How do sacred texts and rituals define who we are and our roles as men and women? What do religious traditions teach communities about gender, bodies, sexuality, and the divine? Women have been defined by, harmed by, excluded from, but also enriched by religions. We consider the difficult question of gender (im)balances from within the 3 major monotheistic religions, examining both how they influence women and how women as individual participants or feminist religious scholars, can influence them. Traditional religious beliefs and values will be examined from an interfaith, Gender Studies perspective, providing the resources to understand, evaluate, and, potentially, challenge the gender-exclusive languages and institutions within religious communities and in the public sphere.
Women of the Medici Family
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: HIS 130 Western Civilization, or equivalent, or sophomore standing
Course code: GND 290 F
Dual Listing: HIS 295 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 255 L The Women of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: For four centuries and thirteen generations (1368-1743), the Medici were the most important family in Tuscany. Even today they remain a source of incredible prestige, their history deeply intertwined with the city of Florence and its territory. They emerged as merchants, became the most powerful bankers of the time, and transformed themselves into the lords of Florence and one of the most important families in Europe. What role did the Medici women play in this spectacular trajectory? As wives? As mothers? As daughters? Through the lens of some of the family’s most famous females, we explore what it was like to live as a woman at the height of Renaissance Florence, how they participated in the major social, political and cultural phenomena of the age, and their influence on the fate of not only their family, but European history in general.
Women of the Medici Family
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: HIS 130 Western Civilization, or equivalent, or sophomore standing
Course code: GND 290 F
Dual Listing: HIS 295 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 255 L The Women of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: For four centuries and thirteen generations (1368-1743), the Medici were the most important family in Tuscany. Even today they remain a source of incredible prestige, their history deeply intertwined with the city of Florence and its territory. They emerged as merchants, became the most powerful bankers of the time, and transformed themselves into the lords of Florence and one of the most important families in Europe. What role did the Medici women play in this spectacular trajectory? As wives? As mothers? As daughters? Through the lens of some of the family’s most famous females, we explore what it was like to live as a woman at the height of Renaissance Florence, how they participated in the major social, political and cultural phenomena of the age, and their influence on the fate of not only their family, but European history in general.
Women of the Medici Family
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: HIS 130 Western Civilization, or equivalent, or sophomore standing
Course code: GND 290 F
Dual Listing: HIS 295 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 255 L The Women of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: For four centuries and thirteen generations (1368-1743), the Medici were the most important family in Tuscany. Even today they remain a source of incredible prestige, their history deeply intertwined with the city of Florence and its territory. They emerged as merchants, became the most powerful bankers of the time, and transformed themselves into the lords of Florence and one of the most important families in Europe. What role did the Medici women play in this spectacular trajectory? As wives? As mothers? As daughters? Through the lens of some of the family’s most famous females, we explore what it was like to live as a woman at the height of Renaissance Florence, how they participated in the major social, political and cultural phenomena of the age, and their influence on the fate of not only their family, but European history in general.
History of Prostitution
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Course code: GND 302 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 260 L History of Prostitution
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Babylon
Description: Prostitution is, and always has been, a complex phenomenon. It lies at the intersection of gender roles, sexual practices, religious and moral views, social power, and legal boundaries. What role did prostitution play in changing ideas about women, sexuality and the body in the formative centuries of the Western tradition? Our focus is on the period from classical antiquity to the Protestant Reformation: with an interdisciplinary approach, we draw on sources from history, religion, mythology, philosophy, the visual arts, literature, and legal documents to explore what prostitution meant, why it has always both existed and been fiercely condemned, and why it continues to divide public opinion up to the present day.
History of Prostitution
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Course code: GND 302 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 260 L History of Prostitution
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: Prostitution is, and always has been, a complex phenomenon. It lies at the intersection of gender roles, sexual practices, religious and moral views, social power, and legal boundaries. What role did prostitution play in changing ideas about women, sexuality and the body in the formative centuries of the Western tradition? Our focus is on the period from classical antiquity to the Protestant Reformation: with an interdisciplinary approach, we draw on sources from history, religion, mythology, philosophy, the visual arts, literature, and legal documents to explore what prostitution meant, why it has always both existed and been fiercely condemned, and why it continues to divide public opinion up to the present day.
History of Prostitution
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Course code: GND 302 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 260 L History of Prostitution
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Prostitution is, and always has been, a complex phenomenon. It lies at the intersection of gender roles, sexual practices, religious and moral views, social power, and legal boundaries. What role did prostitution play in changing ideas about women, sexuality and the body in the formative centuries of the Western tradition? Our focus is on the period from classical antiquity to the Protestant Reformation: with an interdisciplinary approach, we draw on sources from history, religion, mythology, philosophy, the visual arts, literature, and legal documents to explore what prostitution meant, why it has always both existed and been fiercely condemned, and why it continues to divide public opinion up to the present day.
History of Prostitution
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Course code: GND 302 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 260 L History of Prostitution
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Prostitution is, and always has been, a complex phenomenon. It lies at the intersection of gender roles, sexual practices, religious and moral views, social power, and legal boundaries. What role did prostitution play in changing ideas about women, sexuality and the body in the formative centuries of the Western tradition? Our focus is on the period from classical antiquity to the Protestant Reformation: with an interdisciplinary approach, we draw on sources from history, religion, mythology, philosophy, the visual arts, literature, and legal documents to explore what prostitution meant, why it has always both existed and been fiercely condemned, and why it continues to divide public opinion up to the present day.
Gender, Fashion, and Geographies
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher
Notes: in collaboration with University of Hawai?i at Manoa
Course code: GND 433 F
Dual Listing: FAS 433 F
Marist Code/Title:
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: Gender Studies
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Explores ethics of the present and historic expansions of the fashion industry and its environmental impact globally. Examines how gender/race/class shape garment production and consumption and fashion activism in world regions. Emphasis on oral/written communication.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 200 F
Dual Listing: ANC 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 200 F
Dual Listing: ANC 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 200 F
Dual Listing: ANC 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 200 F
Dual Listing: ANC 200 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: A comprehensive introduction to ancient Roman civilization, from its origins in the 8th century BCE to its fall 14 centuries later. Through key events and major figures, we explore a variety of themes and methodological issues: the primary sources of ancient history, the political organization of the Roman state, Rome’s territorial expansion and its cultural and administrative influence in subject lands, Roman religion and the spread of Christianity, the end of the Roman world and the rise of new social models, and the historiographical "myth of Rome." Our problem-oriented approach aims to stimulate critical-thinking skills and developing students’ familiarity in working with historically significant primary sources.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 215 F
Dual Listing: ANC 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 215 F
Dual Listing: ANC 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 215 F
Dual Listing: ANC 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: JANUARY INTERSESSION
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 215 F
Dual Listing: ANC 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 215 F
Dual Listing: ANC 215 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Galileo
Description: Florence’s ancient past, from the city’s origins to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman Florentia gradually emerges before our eyes in the texts of ancient and medieval authors and the archaeological evidence displayed in local museums or only recently unearthed. How did the urban space develop, and what patterns can we identify as we locate the main temples and sacred spaces, the public buildings and private residences? How did the presence of “barbarian” rulers impact the evolution of the ancient city and its territory? We also discuss the city in the context of more general topics in Roman civilization, including its art, architecture, infrastructure and lifestyle. Visits to Florence’s National Archeological Museum and little-known archaeological sites offer unique, firsthand access to the city’s past.
The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: Note: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 235 F
Dual Listing: REL 235 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 256 L The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: An introduction to the Holocaust, its causes, its legacy, and its implications. What role did Christian anti-Judaism play in the Nazi rise to power and the "Final Solution"? How did the Vatican and world Jewry react to the racist policies and violence of Europe’s Fascist regimes, and why? We examine a series of accounts of life in the Nazi-controlled Jewish ghettos and death camps to try to understand what happened and how it was possible, then look at the efforts of particular Christian and Jewish communities to remember and learn from the Holocaust and how best to represent those events today. With a special focus on the Italian Jewish experience leading up to and during the Holocaust, including the rise of Fascism in Italy and the Racial Laws it eventually produced.
The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: HIS 235 F
Dual Listing: REL 235 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 256 L The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An introduction to the Holocaust, its causes, its legacy, and its implications. What role did Christian anti-Judaism play in the Nazi rise to power and the "Final Solution"? How did the Vatican and world Jewry react to the racist policies and violence of Europe’s Fascist regimes, and why? We examine a series of accounts of life in the Nazi-controlled Jewish ghettos and death camps to try to understand what happened and how it was possible, then look at the efforts of particular Christian and Jewish communities to remember and learn from the Holocaust and how best to represent those events today. With a special focus on the Italian Jewish experience leading up to and during the Holocaust, including the rise of Fascism in Italy and the Racial Laws it eventually produced.
The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: HIS 235 F
Dual Listing: REL 235 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 256 L The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: An introduction to the Holocaust, its causes, its legacy, and its implications. What role did Christian anti-Judaism play in the Nazi rise to power and the "Final Solution"? How did the Vatican and world Jewry react to the racist policies and violence of Europe’s Fascist regimes, and why? We examine a series of accounts of life in the Nazi-controlled Jewish ghettos and death camps to try to understand what happened and how it was possible, then look at the efforts of particular Christian and Jewish communities to remember and learn from the Holocaust and how best to represent those events today. With a special focus on the Italian Jewish experience leading up to and during the Holocaust, including the rise of Fascism in Italy and the Racial Laws it eventually produced.
The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: HIS 250 F
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 110 L The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: A firsthand, immersive experience in Florence’s historical center and the four quartieri, or neighborhoods, into which the city has been divided since 1252. Named after their principal church, they have each presented their own unique social, political, and urban characteristics over the centuries, and these themes and questions form the backbone of the course. Which prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities, and historical events have marked the development of each neighborhood? To what extent do these distinctions still prevail today? Other topics include the construction of identity (individual, family, neighborhood, civic); the nature of social capital, networks, and agency; the creation and preservation of local culture; and the complex balance between heritage and transformation. Includes frequent site visits.
The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: HIS 250 F
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 110 L The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Puccini
Description: A firsthand, immersive experience in Florence’s historical center and the four quartieri, or neighborhoods, into which the city has been divided since 1252. Named after their principal church, they have each presented their own unique social, political, and urban characteristics over the centuries, and these themes and questions form the backbone of the course. Which prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities, and historical events have marked the development of each neighborhood? To what extent do these distinctions still prevail today? Other topics include the construction of identity (individual, family, neighborhood, civic); the nature of social capital, networks, and agency; the creation and preservation of local culture; and the complex balance between heritage and transformation. Includes frequent site visits.
The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
FULL
Course code: HIS 250 F
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 110 L The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Donatello
Description: A firsthand, immersive experience in Florence’s historical center and the four quartieri, or neighborhoods, into which the city has been divided since 1252. Named after their principal church, they have each presented their own unique social, political, and urban characteristics over the centuries, and these themes and questions form the backbone of the course. Which prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities, and historical events have marked the development of each neighborhood? To what extent do these distinctions still prevail today? Other topics include the construction of identity (individual, family, neighborhood, civic); the nature of social capital, networks, and agency; the creation and preservation of local culture; and the complex balance between heritage and transformation. Includes frequent site visits.
The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: HIS 250 F
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 110 L The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: A firsthand, immersive experience in Florence’s historical center and the four quartieri, or neighborhoods, into which the city has been divided since 1252. Named after their principal church, they have each presented their own unique social, political, and urban characteristics over the centuries, and these themes and questions form the backbone of the course. Which prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities, and historical events have marked the development of each neighborhood? To what extent do these distinctions still prevail today? Other topics include the construction of identity (individual, family, neighborhood, civic); the nature of social capital, networks, and agency; the creation and preservation of local culture; and the complex balance between heritage and transformation. Includes frequent site visits.
The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: HIS 250 F
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 110 L The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: A firsthand, immersive experience in Florence’s historical center and the four quartieri, or neighborhoods, into which the city has been divided since 1252. Named after their principal church, they have each presented their own unique social, political, and urban characteristics over the centuries, and these themes and questions form the backbone of the course. Which prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities, and historical events have marked the development of each neighborhood? To what extent do these distinctions still prevail today? Other topics include the construction of identity (individual, family, neighborhood, civic); the nature of social capital, networks, and agency; the creation and preservation of local culture; and the complex balance between heritage and transformation. Includes frequent site visits.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: HIS 280 F
Dual Listing: ART 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Raffaello
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: HIS 280 F
Dual Listing: ART 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Course code: HIS 280 F
Dual Listing: ART 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Diamante
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: HIS 280 F
Dual Listing: ART 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Leonardo
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: HIS 280 F
Dual Listing: ART 280 F
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Dante
Description: The social, economic, political, and artistic life of Renaissance Florence, and its close ties to the fortune and fortunes of a group of elite families: the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti. To get an idea of what life was like, at least for some, in the Renaissance city, we examine their art and artistic objects such as wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, clothing, and coats of arms. What can art and material culture tell us about everyday life, and at the same time, what are its limits? Through the lens of these families and the history of their public and private lives, we shed light on a series of characteristics that not only distinguished the Florence of the past, but in some ways still does, as some of these families still play an active role in the city’s life.
Italy's Contribution to Modern Science
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: HIS 281 F
Dual Listing: PHI 281 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 281/ PHIL 281 L Italy's Contribution to Modern Science
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Stone
Description: An introduction to the foundational principles and theories and major historic developments in a variety of scientific disciplines, with a focus on the most important contributions of Italian intellectuals and scientists. We cover a chronological period stretching from the early modern era to the present, examining how monumental figures such as Fibonacci, Galileo, Malpighi, Fermi, and others have contributed to advances in scientific thought and knowledge in fields such as biology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy. How have they been influenced by historical events and pre-existing belief systems? We focus particularly on these scientists’ contribution to developing “purely” scientific methodologies, as well as the ethical framework related to scientific research and experimentation.
Italy's Contribution to Modern Science
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: HIS 281 F
Dual Listing: PHI 281 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 281/ PHIL 281 L Italy's Contribution to Modern Science
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Room: Fellini
Description: An introduction to the foundational principles and theories and major historic developments in a variety of scientific disciplines, with a focus on the most important contributions of Italian intellectuals and scientists. We cover a chronological period stretching from the early modern era to the present, examining how monumental figures such as Fibonacci, Galileo, Malpighi, Fermi, and others have contributed to advances in scientific thought and knowledge in fields such as biology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy. How have they been influenced by historical events and pre-existing belief systems? We focus particularly on these scientists’ contribution to developing “purely” scientific methodologies, as well as the ethical framework related to scientific research and experimentation.
Italy's Contribution to Modern Science
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: HIS 281 F
Dual Listing: PHI 281 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 281/ PHIL 281 L Italy's Contribution to Modern Science
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: An introduction to the foundational principles and theories and major historic developments in a variety of scientific disciplines, with a focus on the most important contributions of Italian intellectuals and scientists. We cover a chronological period stretching from the early modern era to the present, examining how monumental figures such as Fibonacci, Galileo, Malpighi, Fermi, and others have contributed to advances in scientific thought and knowledge in fields such as biology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy. How have they been influenced by historical events and pre-existing belief systems? We focus particularly on these scientists’ contribution to developing “purely” scientific methodologies, as well as the ethical framework related to scientific research and experimentation.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to FRI 8:30 AM-4:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: Special 6-cr course w. full day activity (incl. a 2hr break) and MON-FRI schedule. See brochure/syllabus or request separate info. Current tetanus vaccination + internat. health insurance valid abroad required. In collab. with CAMNES.
Course code: HIS 282-283 T
Dual Listing: ANC 282-283 T ANT 282-283 T
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 Archeology Field I and II
Site: Tuscania
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 6
Hours: 148
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Room: Outdoor Class
Description: An intensive, four-week journey into the world of archaeology, with a unique combination of supervised fieldwork and academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. We explore Etruscan civilization in its material culture, artistic production, and socio-political organization, while contributing to the ongoing excavation and preservation of an active site and learning fundamental archaeological techniques. Offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES), the course is held in Tuscania, one of the richest Etruscan archaeological areas. Includes weekly visits to other relevant sites, monuments and museums, in both the Tuscia region and Rome.
Florence and the House of the Medici
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: HIS 286 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 202 L Florence and the House of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 2 - JULY
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The history of an extraordinary Florentine family and its ties to the city. We trace its fortunes for over three hundred years, from the rise of the Medici bank in the late 14th and early 15th century to the extinction of the princely dynasty in 1737. How did the Medici amass and wield their immense power? How were they able to rule Florence, control the papacy, act as the "needle of the Italian compass" and, at times, influence the policies of an entire continent? The family’s ranks included statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs and impresarios, as well as both poets and popes. Through the Medici we also explore some of the most important philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and the great artists and intellectuals–including Michelangelo, Politian, Donatello, and Botticelli–who worked under their patronage. Includes numerous visits to palaces, churches, and museums.
Florence and the House of the Medici
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: HIS 286 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 202 L Florence and the House of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Room: Firenze
Description: The history of an extraordinary Florentine family and its ties to the city. We trace its fortunes for over three hundred years, from the rise of the Medici bank in the late 14th and early 15th century to the extinction of the princely dynasty in 1737. How did the Medici amass and wield their immense power? How were they able to rule Florence, control the papacy, act as the "needle of the Italian compass" and, at times, influence the policies of an entire continent? The family’s ranks included statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs and impresarios, as well as both poets and popes. Through the Medici we also explore some of the most important philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and the great artists and intellectuals–including Michelangelo, Politian, Donatello, and Botticelli–who worked under their patronage. Includes numerous visits to palaces, churches, and museums.
Florence and the House of the Medici
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: HIS 286 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 202 L Florence and the House of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marconi
Description: The history of an extraordinary Florentine family and its ties to the city. We trace its fortunes for over three hundred years, from the rise of the Medici bank in the late 14th and early 15th century to the extinction of the princely dynasty in 1737. How did the Medici amass and wield their immense power? How were they able to rule Florence, control the papacy, act as the "needle of the Italian compass" and, at times, influence the policies of an entire continent? The family’s ranks included statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs and impresarios, as well as both poets and popes. Through the Medici we also explore some of the most important philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and the great artists and intellectuals–including Michelangelo, Politian, Donatello, and Botticelli–who worked under their patronage. Includes numerous visits to palaces, churches, and museums.
Florence and the House of the Medici
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
FULL
Course code: HIS 286 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 202 L Florence and the House of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SUMMER 1 - JUNE
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 48
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The history of an extraordinary Florentine family and its ties to the city. We trace its fortunes for over three hundred years, from the rise of the Medici bank in the late 14th and early 15th century to the extinction of the princely dynasty in 1737. How did the Medici amass and wield their immense power? How were they able to rule Florence, control the papacy, act as the "needle of the Italian compass" and, at times, influence the policies of an entire continent? The family’s ranks included statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs and impresarios, as well as both poets and popes. Through the Medici we also explore some of the most important philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and the great artists and intellectuals–including Michelangelo, Politian, Donatello, and Botticelli–who worked under their patronage. Includes numerous visits to palaces, churches, and museums.
Florence and the House of the Medici
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: HIS 286 F
Marist Code/Title: HIST 202 L Florence and the House of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: FALL
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Room: Sergio Leone
Description: The history of an extraordinary Florentine family and its ties to the city. We trace its fortunes for over three hundred years, from the rise of the Medici bank in the late 14th and early 15th century to the extinction of the princely dynasty in 1737. How did the Medici amass and wield their immense power? How were they able to rule Florence, control the papacy, act as the "needle of the Italian compass" and, at times, influence the policies of an entire continent? The family’s ranks included statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs and impresarios, as well as both poets and popes. Through the Medici we also explore some of the most important philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and the great artists and intellectuals–including Michelangelo, Politian, Donatello, and Botticelli–who worked under their patronage. Includes numerous visits to palaces, churches, and museums.
Women of the Medici Family
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: HIS 130 Western Civilization, or equivalent, or sophomore standing
Course code: HIS 295 F
Dual Listing: GND 290 F
Marist Code/Title: HST 255 L The Women of the Medici
Site: Florence
Session: SPRING
School: Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
Department: History
Credits: 3
Hours: 45
Premises: Via del Giglio, 15
Room: Petrarca
Description: For four centuries and thirteen generations (1368-1743), the Medici were the most important family in Tuscany. Even today they remain a source of incredible prestige, their history deeply intertwined with the city of Florence and its territory. They emerged as merchants, became the most po